Man gets world’s first skull and scalp transplant

Texas doctors say they have done the world’s first partial skull and scalp transplant to help a man with a large head wound from cancer treatment.

MD Anderson Cancer Center and Houston Methodist Hospital doctors announced Thursday that they performed the 15-hour-long surgery on May 22 at Houston Methodist.

The recipient — Jim Boysen, a 55-year-old software developer from Austin, Texas — expects to leave the hospital Thursday. He received a new kidney and pancreas along with the scalp and skull grafts in two operations that spanned over 24 hours.

“I feel much better than I did two weeks ago, believe it or not,” Boysen said at a news conference Thursday.

Boysen said he was stunned at how well doctors matched him to a donor with similar skin and coloring.

“It’s kind of shocking, really, how good they got it. I will have way more hair than when I was 21,” Boysen joked in an interview with The Associated Press.


“This was a very complex surgery because we had to transplant the tissues utilizing microsurgery,” Dr. Michael Klebuc, the surgeon who led the Houston Methodist Hospital plastic surgery team, said in a statement. “Imagine connecting blood vessels 1/16 of an inch under a microscope with tiny stitches about half the diameter of a human hair being done with tools that one would use to make a fine Swiss watch.”

Last year, doctors in the Netherlands said they replaced most of a woman’s skull with a 3-D printed plastic one. The Texas operation is thought to be the first skull-scalp transplant from a human donor, as opposed to an artificial implant or a simple bone graft.

Boysen had a kidney-pancreas transplant in 1992 to treat diabetes he has had since age 5 and has been on drugs to prevent organ rejection. The immune suppression drugs raise the risk of cancer, and he developed a rare type called leiomyosarcoma (pronounced lee-oh-my-oh-sar-KOHM-ah).

It can affect many types of smooth muscles but in his case, it was the ones under the scalp that make your hair stand on end when something gives you the creeps.

Radiation therapy for the cancer destroyed part of his head, immune suppression drugs kept his body from repairing the damage, and his transplanted organs were starting to fail — “a perfect storm that made the wound not heal,” Boysen said.

Yet doctors could not perform a new kidney-pancreas transplant as long as he had an open wound. That’s when Dr. Jesse Selber, a reconstructive plastic surgeon at MD Anderson, thought of giving him a new partial skull and scalp at the same time as new organs as a solution to all of his problems.

Houston Methodist, which has transplant expertise, partnered on the venture. It took 18 months for the organ procurement organization, LifeGift, to find the right donor, who provided all organs for Boysen. The donor was not identified.

Boysen “had a wound that was basically all the way through his skull to his brain,” Selber said.

In an operation involving about a dozen doctors and 40 other health workers, Boysen was given a cap-shaped, 10-by-10-inch skull graft, and a 15-inch-wide scalp graft starting above his forehead, extending across the top of his head and over its crown. It ends an inch above one ear and two inches above the other.

The pancreas and kidney were transplanted after the head surgery was done.

“I was pleased that, despite the difficult nature of the procedure, the donor and recipient surgeries worked flawlessly,” said Dr. A. Osama Gaber, director of the Houston Methodist J.C. Walter Jr. Transplant Center and the surgeon who performed the kidney and pancreas transplants. “Our nurses and transplant coordinators fell in love with Jim and were excited to see him do so well.”

 

Fresno,CA Police Officer Accepts Probation for Raping Another Cop

Former Fresno police officer William Wyatt pleaded no contest Thursday afternoon to raping a woman while she was unconscious.

The plea in Fresno County Superior Court comes five years after the woman, a former Reedley police officer, contended she was date raped in 2010.

Wyatt, who is free on bond, will be sentenced on July 14.

Fresno defense attorney Mark Broughton, who represented Wyatt, said Thursday his client accepted a plea agreement because it offered him “probation with no additional time in custody.”

If Wyatt, 36, had been convicted at trial, he would have faced up to eight years in prison.

Wyatt joined the force in 2003 as a patrol officer. A department spokesman said Wyatt was terminated Sept. 19, 2012.

The case against him surfaced in January 2012, when Chief Jerry Dyer said he learned of the allegation from Reedley police Chief Joe Garza, who called him to report that a female officer had accused Wyatt of “sexually assaulting her without her knowledge and while she was incapacitated.”

Once the allegation surfaced, Dyer took Wyatt’s badge, gun and power to make an arrest.

According to the court documents, a sergeant in Fresno Police Department’s Internal Affairs notified Fresno County sheriff’s detective Andrea McCormick about the rape allegation on Jan. 19, 2012. The Sheriff’s Department investigated because the crime happened in a county island in Fresno near Palm and Gettysburg avenues.

McCormick wrote in an affidavit that the woman said Wyatt and two of his friends went with her to Club Habanos in northwest Fresno for drinks in the summer of 2010.

The woman said she remembered only arriving at the bar but nothing else “due to heavy alcohol consumption,” McCormick wrote in her affidavit. The woman remembered waking up the following morning in Wyatt’s bedroom wearing sweat pants and a white T-shirt that didn’t belong to her. She then asked Wyatt to take her home.

The woman didn’t know she had been raped until Jan. 18, 2012, when she learned of photographs on Wyatt’s computer that showed her having sex with him, McCormick wrote.

The woman told the detective that the photographs showed “she is clearly passed out while the officer was having sex with her,” the affidavit said.

The woman also told the detective that she didn’t remember having sex and could not have given consent because she was extremely intoxicated, the affidavit said.

McCormick’s affidavit was in support of a warrant to search Wyatt’s home. Several computers and an iPhone were seized as evidence, the court documents said.

Wyatt was arrested in August 2012. After being booked into jail, he was released after posting bail.

I guess sometimes cops are not even safe from each other


Chinese hackers breach federal government’s personnel office

Hackers working for the Chinese state breached the computer system of the Office of Personnel Management in December, U.S. officials said Thursday, and the agency will notify some 4 million current and former federal employees that their personal data may have been compromised.

The hack was the second major intrusion of the same agency by China in less than a year and the second significant foreign breach into U.S. government networks in recent months. Russia last year compromised White House and State Department e-mail systems in a campaign of cyber-espionage.

OPM, using new tools, discovered the breach in April, according to officials at the agency who declined to discuss who was behind the hack.

Other U.S. officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity citing the ongoing investigation, identified the hackers as being state-sponsored.

The intruders gained potential access to information that included employees’ Social Security numbers, job assignments, performance ratings and training information, agency officials said. They could not say for certain which data was taken, but only what the hackers gained access to.

“Certainly, OPM is a high value target,” said OPM Chief Information Officer Donna Seymour, in an interview. “We have a lot of information about people, and that is something that our adversaries want.”

The personal information exposed could be useful in crafting “spear-phishing” e-mails, which are designed to fool recipients into opening a link or an attachment so that the hacker can gain access to computer systems. Using the stolen OPM data, for instance, a hacker might send a fake e-mail purporting to be from a colleague at work.

After the earlier breach discovered in March 2014, OPM undertook “an aggressive effort to update our cybersecurity posture, adding numerous tools and capabilities to our networks,” Seymour said. “As a result of adding these tools, we were able to detect this intrusion into our networks.”

“Protecting our federal employee data from malicious cyber incidents is of the highest priority at OPM,” said the agency’s director, Katherine Archuleta, in a statement.

In the current incident, the hackers targeted an OPM data center housed at the Department of the Interior. The database did not contain information on background investigations or employees applying for security clearances, officials said.

By contrast, in March 2014, OPM officials discovered that hackers had breached an OPM system that manages sensitive data on federal employees applying for clearances. That often includes financial data, information about family and other sensitive details. That breach, too, was attributed to China, other officials said.

OPM officials declined comment on whether the data affected in this incident was encrypted or had sensitive details masked. They said it appeared that the intruders are no longer in the system.

Trust me the Feds keep us safe all over the world, right?

Waco tyranny still continues on…….

Two bikers out of 170 who were arrested after a shootout in Waco, Texas have been released, and now they are speaking out.

William and Morgan English, a married biker couple, posted a reduced bail of $25,000 and were released from jail on Monday. The couple have been in jail since their arrest on May 17, following a brawl at the Twin Peaks Sports Bar in Waco that left nine people dead and 18 injured.

The couple are still being charged with a felonies for engaging in organized crime, facing prison sentences that could land them behind bars for life.

“This whole thing is a sham,” said former marine William English, 33, who is a member of the Distorted Motorcycle Club. “I’m kind of upset that we had to pay to get out of jail when we did nothing wrong.”

Morgan English also says neither of them broke the law, explaining that they had arrived late to the meetup, right before gunfire broke out.

“All of a sudden I see a sea of people running towards me, and we run around the building,” said Morgan.

Paul Looney, the couple’s attorney, said their cases will go to a grand jury. Looney called the mass arrests “the most un-American activity I’ve ever seen conducted by a law enforcement agency.”

“These are great, salt of the earth people that formerly had the respect of the community,” Looney said. “In their community they have been broadcast as being thugs and members of a secret gang.”

Waco Police Sergeant Patrick Swanton is defending the actions of the police. “It’s pretty commonplace for arrestees to complain about being arrested. Our investigation is continuing, and the justice system is working as it should,” Swanton said.

WHAT THE FUCK he just say? They agreed to release people if they sign forms promising to not to sue the police and or city. Holding their freedom over their heads as a hammer to intimidate them, and this is how the justice is supposed to work? Either they are a danger to the community or they are not is how that decision should be made.

Retro of the day: Al Green

.”Tired of Being Alone” is a soul song written by Al Green that became popular in the early 1970s and remains popular to this day, being a score in popular shows such as Nip/Tuck. It reached #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 and # 7 on the Hot Soul Singles Chart. Billboard ranked it as the No. 12 song for 1971.

Though released on the 1971 album, Al Green Gets Next to You, the song was written in late 1968 and intended to be released on the 1969 album, Green Is Blues. Problems occurred with the first recording, so it was postponed for production. It was altered and perfected the second time around.

Tired of Being Alone” was produced and recorded by Willie Mitchell at Hi Records and mixed by Mitchell and Terry Manning.

In 2004, Green’s version was ranked #293 on Rolling Stone‘s list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.