Tell me about that “living wage” again?

Walmart closures a “double blow” for many frustrated residents


 

More than 100 Walmarts around the country shut their doors Thursday for good — many in small towns and rural areas with few other shopping options.

The retailer cites a long-term strategy shift and financial performance. Company shares are down 25 percent over the past 12 months, and the nationwide closureswill also impact thousands of employees, reports CBS News correspondent David Begnaud.

“It’s maddening because Walmart chose to do this,” said resident Retha Thompson, who feels betrayed by Walmart’s decision to leave Whitewright, Texas just 12 months after its grand opening. “They chose to come here and then when they put the other grocery store out of business, they want to close down and leave. I’m mad.”


 

She’s talking about “Pettit’s,” the mom and pop grocery that was a mainstay in this small town for nearly 60 years.

“Business – it just quit coming,” Larry Deeds, the store’s co-owner said.

Pettit’s closed about nine months after Walmart opened.

“It’s almost enough to bring a tear to your eye to see all these shelves empty,” said Will Pettit, who worked here since he was 16.

When Walmart moved in last year, Whitewright’s Mayor Allen West said a little competition from Walmart was a good thing. But now that it’s leaving, “it’s going to hurt the city financially, it’s going to hurt the citizens economically and not good for their mental status,” the mayor said.

Walmart is closing 154 stores in 27 states, many of them in small towns. In a statement to CBS News, Walmart said:

“The decision to close some of our stores was not easy and we share in the communities’ disappointment. We’re always searching for opportunities to serve more customers throughout the country — especially those in underserved communities. We’re now focused on where we can help impacted communities through our plans for charitable giving and expediting the process to work with potential buyers for these locations.”

“Communities are finally getting a look at not only the effects of when Walmart comes into town, but also when they leave,” said Bloomberg news reporter Shannon Pettypiece. “And I think that is a double blow for a lot people.”

But Deeds said Walmart doesn’t deserve all the blame.

“I lost some customers that had been coming to me for 20 or more years,” Deeds said.

And now that Walmart is closed, Retha Thompson will drive half an hour to the closest grocery store.

“It won’t be Walmart. I’m done with Walmart,” Thompson said.

Two of Thompson’s daughters-in-law were Walmart employees. They were offered either a severance package or the opportunity to relocate to work at another store, as goes for thousands of other employees across the country.

People demand more money, then get it, then complain when business cannot sustain those wages. What a bunch of dumasses

More Trump Haters keeping him popular…….

Last Wednesday, a dozen high school students from the Tulsa area were able to sneak a banner reading “Trump Makes America Hate Again” into the Mabee Arena where Trump was holding a campaign rally.

It amazes me that these Trump haters manage to keep his face on the front page every day, they are helping keep him popular and I am sure he is grateful.

Ex-Prosecutor diGenova: FBI ‘Would Go Ballistic’ If Hillary Not Indicted


The FBI and intelligence community “would go ballistic” if there’s no indictment in the case of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s use of her private email server to conduct government business, former federal prosecutor Joseph diGenova tells Newsmax TV.

In an interview with “Newsmax Now” hosts John Bachman and Miranda Khan on Friday, the former U.S. Attorney in the District of Columbia says the FBI will wrap up its probe of Clinton’s email use in the next two to three months.

“This case is about the future of enforcement of classified information,” diGenova declared. “[Clinton] has gotten a pass up to this point on any accusation being made public. But those days are going to be short lived.”

DiGenova says he expects a “compelling case with unassailable evidence” proving Clinton’s use of private unencrypted devices “compromised inner documents and transmissions” – some of which were “top secret.”

But it will be Obama administration-appointed Attorney General Loretta Lynch who will make the decision on whether or not to bring an indictment, he notes.

“And if the attorney general were to decide that there would not be an indictment, I can assure you that the FBI and the intelligence community would go ballistic,” he declared.

The only reason she would not prosecute, he asserts, “will be political.”

“I don’t believe she can do that under the law and if she does turn it down, [FBI Director James] Comey and the bureau and the director of Central Intelligence and [the National Security Agency] will do some incredible leaking that will burn your ears,” he said.

DiGenova insists the record already shows there was “unequivocally” a violation of federal law in Clinton and her staff’s use of private emails while she served as head of the State Department.

He added, however, that the intelligence community and FBI “are very concerned that there must be charges in this case because if not, they will never be able to prosecute any other federal employee for negligently handling classified information.”