SHERIFF REFUSES TO ACCEPT CHILD PORN SENTENCE

San Francisco sheriff refuses to accept sentence of political consultant

by Marty Carlson

1-25-17

Vicki Hennessy


Enrique Pearce

 

                                     

San Francisco sheriff, Vicki Hennessey, is refusing to honor the plea deal given to high profile political consultant Enrique Pearce

Pearce had pled guilty to child pornography, and apparently had cut a deal with the judge for six months of home detention, enforced by an ankle monitor, and that’s the part the sheriff won’t sign off on.

Under San Francisco sheriff department policies people convicted of child pornography, perpetrators of domestic violence and some other categories of criminals don’t qualify for electronic monitoring.

Pearce who has worked for Mayor Ed Lee and supervisor Norman Yee and Jane Kim, pled guilty in December on two counts of distributing child pornography, one count of buying or receiving stolen property, and one count of possession or control of child pornography. The allegations are possessing more than 600 images of children under 18 and possessing matter that portrayed sexual sadism or sexual masochism involving someone under 18 according to court documents.

Judge Navarro, a retired judge from Santa Clara County, is temporary assigned to the San Francisco Superior Court, raised some eyebrows when he accepted Pearce’s guilty plea over prosecutor’s objections. The prosecution wanted jail time.

Under the plea deal that was agreed to, that was too been made official on Wednesday, Pierce would’ve probably only served three months of a six-month house arrest sentence. He was also expected to be put on five years’ probation and register as a sex offender.

The Sheriff’s Department contract out its home detentions cases to an outside contractor and apparently, there are alternatives that he can report two different monitoring services in the area.

In 2010, judge Navarro had planned to sentence a man convicted of check forging to five years in prison, Santa Clara prosecutors wanted a longer term and appealed all the way to the Supreme Court.

The court eventually ruled that judges cannot bargain directly with defendants, but can resolve the case by telling a defendant that the sentence would be if he pleads guilty to all charges.