A VIEW OF DEATH THROUGH A SUICIDE MACHINE…….

A controversial 3D-printed death machine designed to send people to the afterlife peacefully will be ‘tested’ by the public for the first time.

The ‘Sarco’ is the creation of 70-year-old Australian euthanasia advocate Philip Nitschke, also known as ‘Dr Death’.

When a button is pressed, the Sarco will fill with nitrogen, resulting in the person losing consciousness after one minute and dying after five minutes.

It will be unveiled at the Amsterdam Funeral Fair on Saturday, where attendees can get a glimpse into what it will be like to step in the Sarco using a virtual reality headset.

However, the plans have already been met with outrage with the machine being described as ‘gruesome’ and ‘glamorising suicide’.


A controversial 3D-printed death machine designed to send people to the afterlife peacefully will be ‘tested’ by the public for the first time. However, the plans have already been met with outrage with the machine being described as ‘gruesome’ and ‘glamorising suicide’

The Sarco is a 3D-printable machine that kills people by hypoxia when oxygen levels are scarce.

A person who wants to use Nitschke’s machine to commit suicide has to do an online test to show that they are sane and want to die of their own will.

They then receive a four-digit code that is valid for 24 hours. After entering the code into the machine, a special button can be pressed to begin the process.

A funeral fair spokesman said that visitors ‘can undergo the entire experience with virtual reality glasses to see if this could be a preferred life ending for them.’

Through the virtual glasses, the visitors can choose a view of the Alps or the sea as their last moment.

They then press the suicide button, after which the sight with their virtual reality glasses will slowly turn black.


The ‘Sarco’ is the creation of 70-year-old Australian euthanasia advocate Philip Nitschke, also known as ‘Dr Death’ (pictured)

Dr Nitschke developed the Sarco with engineer Alexander Bannick in the Netherlands, with the aim of making it available worldwide.

Rather than looking for a ‘dignified’ death, Dr Nitschke says it could a ‘euphoric’ experience.

‘What if we dared to imagine that our last day on this planet might also be one of our most exciting?’ he wrote in an in-depth feature for Huffington Post.

‘It can be transported wherever one chooses’, Dr Nitschke explains, for example facing the Rockies or looking out over the Pacific Ocean.

 

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