NEVADA ORDERS NO MALARIA DRUGS

NEVADA ORDERS NO MALARIA DRUGS

NEVADA ORDERS NO MALARIA DRUGS AND HAS has signed an emergency order barring the use of anti-malaria drugs for someone who has the coronavirus.

Democratic Gov. Steve Sisolak‘s order Tuesday restricting chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine comes after President Donald Trump touted the medication as a treatment for the virus.

Trump last week falsely stated that the Food and Drug Administration had just approved the use of chloroquine to treat patients infected with coronavirus. After the FDA’s chief said the drug still needs to be tested for that use, Trump overstated the drug’s potential benefits in containing the virus.

Sisolak said in a statement that there’s no consensus among experts or Nevada doctors that the drugs can treat people with COVID-19. His order also limits a prescription to a 30-day supply to ensure it’s available for “legitimate medical purposes” and so that people cannot find a way to stockpile the drug.

NEVADA ORDERS NO MALARIA DRUGS

The governor’s rule comes a day after a Phoenix-area man died and his wife was in critical condition from taking an additive used to clean fish tanks known as chloroquine phosphate, similar to the drug used to treat malaria.

DAWG SAYS: HE MAY HAVE A LEGITAMITE REASON FOR THIS, BUT I HAVE NOT SEEN IT. IF HE IS DOING IT TO JUST BECAUSE TRUMP TALKED ABOUT THE DEMOCAT GOVERNOR NEEDS TO CALM DOWN LIKE EVERYONE ELSE NEEDS TO DO…….

DIPSHIDIOT OF THE DAY: TWISTED PRANK LADY


A woman played a “twisted prank” at a Pennsylvania grocery store Wednesday by purposely coughing on about $35,000 worth of food, which had to be thrown out, the supermarket said.

“Today was a very challenging day,” Joe Fasula wrote on the Facebook page of the Gerrity’s supermarket chain, which he co-owns.

“A woman, who the police know to be a chronic problem in the community,” walked into the chain’s Hanover Township store and “proceeded to purposely cough on our fresh produce, and a small section of our bakery, meat case and grocery,” Fasula said. Authorities are working to get the woman tested for coronavirus, he said.

“While there is little doubt this woman was doing it as a very twisted prank … we had no choice but to throw out all product she came in contact with,” he said. “Working closely with the Hanover Township health inspector, we identified every area that she was in, we disposed of the product and thoroughly cleaned and disinfected everything.”

Fasula wrote that supermarket staff estimated the value of the food to be “well over $35,000.”

“I am also absolutely sick to my stomach about the loss of food,” Fasula wrote. “While it is always a shame when food is wasted, in these times when so many people are worried about the security of our food supply, it is even more disturbing.”

In a statement last week in which Fasula announced employees at his nine stores would receive an extra $1 an hour, he shared that some departments, including the meat and dairy sections, were lacking food as people rushed to stock up in the midst of the pandemic.

Fasula said his staff “did the best they could to get the woman out of the store as fast as possible” and get police on the scene. He added that the local district attorney’s office said it will pursue charges against the woman.

The Hanover Township Police Department confirmed in a statement that it is investigating the incident and that charges would be filed against the suspect, who underwent a mental health evaluation.

See police press release here:

DAWGS SAYS: I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW THE REAL MOTIVE HERE BUT THERE ARE SOME SICK PEOPLE WHO NEED HELP OUT THERE…..

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND COVID-19

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND COVID-19: Domestic Abuse Victims in ‘Worst-Case Scenario’ During Outbreak

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND COVID-19: advocates worry that the changes to everyday life brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic stay-at-home mandates, job losses and school closures may worsen already strained relationships, leading to increased rates of domestic abuse.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND COVID-19: One evening last week, a 38-year-old woman showed up in the emergency room of a Los Angeles hospital. She had been beaten up by her boyfriend.

Under normal circumstances, the hospital would contact a domestic violence advocate, who would meet with the woman in person and help her find shelter and other services. But that night, because of limitations on visitors and health guidelines due to COVID-19, an advocate had to connect by phone.

About a dozen calls later, the survivor was placed in a shelter.

“We got lucky this time,” said Yvette Lozano, the chief program and operating officer for Peace Over Violence, a nonprofit focused on ending interpersonal relationship violence. “It’s really hard to find an immediate placement for someone in need.”

Lozano and other advocates worry that the changes to everyday life brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic — stay-at-home mandates, job losses and school closures — may worsen already strained relationships, leading to increased rates of domestic abuse. Others are concerned that those who are suffering may be less inclined to report a crime or reach out for help.

“For someone who is in an abusive relationship, this is kind of a worst-case scenario,” said Alyson Messenger, a managing staff attorney with the Jenesse Center, a domestic violence organization based in South Los Angeles. “Compound that with the fact that access to services is more difficult than ever.”

This nightmare for domestic violence victims has already played out elsewhere. The number of such incidents in China has risen sharply as people across much of that country have been quarantined, according to Chinese news sources. Already, the National Domestic Violence Hotline has begun to field some highly distressing calls as quarantine measures have been implemented, said the hotline’s chief executive, Katie Ray-Jones.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND COVID-19

One woman said her partner threatened to throw her out onto the street if she showed any symptoms of COVID-19. Another said her partner vowed to prevent her from seeking medical care if she gets sick.

Al Provinziano, a family lawyer in Los Angeles, said the number of calls to his firm related to domestic violence has doubled this week.

“People are saying that they can’t believe they’ll be stuck with their abuser, and that they don’t know how they’re going to get through this period of quarantine,” Provinziano said.

The notion that stress and isolation lead to higher rates of domestic violence is not new. During the Great Recession in 2008 and 2009, the National Domestic Violence Hotline fielded many calls from those in long-term abusive relationships who said the violence against them had grown more intense, said Ray-Jones.

Research has found a relationship between natural disasters and increased rates of interpersonal violence, especially among households that experience significant financial strain. After Hurricane Andrew, a Category 5 storm that made landfall in South Florida in 1992, spousal-abuse calls to Miami’s helpline increased by 50%, researchers found. In L.A., advocates saw domestic violence rise in the aftermath of the 1994 Northridge earthquake.

The concern isn’t that quarantine will cause normally peaceful partners and parents to suddenly become abusive. Rather, it’s likely that widespread isolation and stress-inducing conditions — such as job loss and feelings of helplessness — will increase the number and severity of such incidents in households that have already seen a cycle of violence, advocates say.

“Domestic violence is rooted in power and control,” Ray-Jones said. “When an abuser loses that power control, they tend to exert or take that out on the victims in their relationship.”

At the same time, survivors will be less able to break away from the surveillance of their abusers. And those who might have stayed with aging parents are less likely to do so now, as the elderly are far more vulnerable to the effects of COVID-19.

It’s estimated that more than 10 million people experience domestic violence in the U.S. each year, and the number of homicides related to domestic violence has been on the rise since 2010. In L.A. County, as overall homicides have declined, the number of women slain has steadily risen.

Income loss might also make it more difficult for victims to leave. Someone who has saved money in order to execute an escape plan may now be forced to use that cash in the face of job loss or a reduction in hours.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND COVID-19

And when victims of domestic violence aren’t out in the community, the red flags of abuse are less likely to be noticed by friends and family members.

“We get reports through schools or hospitals that somebody has had a physical injury, but kids aren’t going to school right now, and people are avoiding hospitals,” said Tara Peterson, executive director of the YWCA of Glendale.

The East Los Angeles Women’s Center uses hundreds of trained promotoras, women who educate their communities about healthy relationships, to connect with those in East and South Los Angeles who are most at risk for violence, said Barbara Kappos, the center’s executive director. Now, the ladies can’t meet weekly and in-person to help those who may be the most resistant.

In response to COVID-19, the Los Angeles Police Department last week closed front desks and walk-up services to “ensure social distancing,” a move that worried those who work with victims and utilize police to report abuse. The county courts are still open for essential functions, which include processing petitions for emergency domestic-violence restraining orders. Judges may still issue emergency protective orders at the request of law enforcement, which can lead to the temporary removal of an abuser from a home.

If victims are seeking a temporary restraining order or an emergency protective order, they can go to their local stations and will be assisted, said LAPD Assistant Chief Robert Arcos in an email.

Each station has a night-watch detective available to assist domestic violence victims, he said, and teams that respond to such incidents will continue to be deployed. As of Monday, Arcos said, he hadn’t seen an increase in calls for service.

Meanwhile, organizations that provide services to domestic violence victims and survivors in L.A. County are forced to be creative in serving their clients. In-person support groups have been replaced by virtual ones. Therapists are deploying code words with their clients to keep them safe. Although many shelters are full across the county, hotlines are available.

Patti Giggans, executive director of Peace Over Violence, said her staff of about 70 is working remotely. Counseling and staff meetings have been conducted virtually.

“We’re committed to not abandoning any people who are on our caseloads,” she said.

Carmen McDonald, director of legal services at the Los Angeles Center for Law and Justice, worries that victims now will be less likely to seek services. Already, she said, she’s seeing a decline in new clients and requests for legal assistance.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND COVID-19

“We know what is going on with our clients, but we don’t know what’s going on with the other folks who need services,” she said.

It is still uncertain how shelters for victims of domestic violence will be affected by the pandemic. But some warn that it may become increasingly difficult to find a spot at an emergency shelter.

Elizabeth Eastlund, executive director of Rainbow Services in San Pedro, said the organization’s transitional and emergency shelters are full and aren’t cycling people in and out due to the uncertainty of the pandemic. If clients don’t have a solid plan for where they will go next, they’re not leaving.

Peterson said the YWCA of Glendale’s small shelter for domestic violence victims is open, and a handful of its 12 beds are available. The YWCA will provide vouchers for hotel rooms once the shelter is full.

The Glendale shelter is not screening residents for the coronavirus but does have a designated, private space for anyone presenting COVID-19 symptoms.

Though organizations that help survivors do not expect to halt services anytime soon, the pandemic has already affected their finances. The YWCA of Glendale had to cancel its biggest fundraiser, scheduled for April.

“We rely on that money to be able to be nimble and provide additional resources,” Peterson said. “We are monitoring the situation daily, but we’re concerned about being fully operational if this goes on longer than a couple of months.”

OTHER ARTICLES THAT SHOWS IT CAN HAPPEN IN ALL WALKS OF LIFE:

TIMELINE OF A SHERIFFS DEPUTY’S ABUSE, DOMESTICE VIOLENCE, AND LACK OF DUE DILIGENCE…….

REPOST FROM JANUARY 2018: TIMELINE OF A SHERIFFS DEPUTY’S ABUSE, DOMESTICE VIOLENCE, AND LACK OF DUE DILIGENCE…….

TRAITS OF AN ABUSER OR CONTROLLING PARTNER…….

https://dawgonnit.com/2018/01/27/dawgs-blog-podcast-audio-1-27-2018/

If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, call 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) for the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

DAWG SAYS: IF ANYONE IS IN THIS SITUATION YOU CAN ALSO GET AHOLD OF DAWGS BLOG AND I WILL DO ALL I CAN TO HELP. JUST SEND AN EMAIL TO DAWGONNITDAWGSBLOG@GMAIL.COM. THERE IS ALWAYS A WAY TO GET HELP I DO NOT CARE WHERE YOU ARE

SHOCK DEVICE HELPS YOUR VICES

ALWAYS SOMETHING NEW


If you’ve been struggling to save money or to control your cravings for junk foods, perhaps it’s time to consider a self-administered electric shock device to helps your vices,
shocks you next time you reach for the fries!

A company called Pavlok is now selling a device on Amazon that’s designed to improve your life in many ways. The manufacturer describes this product as a “behavior training device and works by utilizing Aversive Conditioning.”

The black bracelet has 150 zaps per charge, which means its battery could last a good few days, depending on how “naughty” you’ve been.


It’s Time to Stop Spending Too Much Money or Eating Junk Food

Basically, every time you step out of line, the strap gives you a 350-volt electric shock, just to give you a gentle reminder.

Apparently, your friends can even download an app compatible with the strap, meaning they can give you a buzz if they catch you going for an extra slice of cake or a spending spree.

The product’s creator explains:

“Aversive conditioning is essentially behavior training that uses negative stimuli (in this case a small electric shock) and association to help reaffirm a specific action as undesirable.”

“The reason so many people continue to smoke even though they know it’s bad… is because for many smoking IS pleasurable.”

“The reason so many people continue to consume an unhealthy snack after unhealthy snack is that it often DOES taste good.”

“And that’s why Pavlok is ultimately so effective.”

Pavlok Can Also Help You Break Several Other Annoying Habits

The strap can help you control habits like wasting time online, mindless eating, eating fast food, biting your nails, smoking, and oversleeping.

And according to the product reviews, this device works best for those who have a problem waking up in the morning.

The way the bracelet works is rather simple. The inventor of this strap compares it to having food poisoning – once you get it, you stop eating the food that gave you the poisoning, and that’s called aversive conditioning.

“Using the slightly uncomfortable stimulus of an electric shock, Pavlok helps train your brain to associate a bad habit with the uncomfortable stimulus. And after as little as a few weeks of associating the two with consistent use, your brain begins to say: ‘Hey, wait a second. Maybe I DON’T like smoking.’ ‘Hey, wait a second, maybe that donut doesn’t do much for me at all.'”

DAWG SAYS: THINK OF THE POSSIBILITIES……