TWEET TRUMP GET RICH

TWEET TRUMP GET RICH AND DON’T SUPPLY EQUIPMENT

TWEET TRUMP GET RICH BY SELLING

SOMETHING YOU DONT HAVE

An engineer who received a $69.1 million contract from New York state, after replying to one of President Trump‘s tweets, never provided the ventilators, BuzzFeed News reported Wednesday.

New York state signed a contract with electrical engineer Yaron Oren-Pines in late March for 1,450 ventilators at a price of $47,656 per ventilator, which is about triple the standard retail price of high-end versions, a state official told BuzzFeed News. But none of the ventilators ever showed up.

The state official told BuzzFeed News that the state entered the contract with Oren-Pines because the White House coronavirus task force recommended him.

The contract has since been terminated, and New York is scrambling to retrieve its money.

“The guy was recommended to us by the White House coronavirus task force because they were doing business with him, as well,” the official said. “I think everyone was genuinely trying to help each other out and get supplies.”

The payment to Oren-Pines was the largest single payment made by the state’s health department under Gov. Andrew Cuomo‘s (D) executive order to speed up retrieving medical equipment, according to BuzzFeed News.

Officials declined to say how much of the payment the state was able to get back.

BuzzFeed News found that New York signed a contract with Oren-Pines three days after he replied to Trump’s tweet calling for Ford and General Motors to develop more ventilators.

“We can supply ICU Ventilators, invasive and noninvasive,” Oren-Pines said on March 27. “Have someone call me URGENT.”

Oren-Pines told BuzzFeed News that “neither me nor my company is providing any comment on this.”

Katie Miller, a spokeswoman for Vice President Pence, said in a statement obtained by BuzzFeed News that “the White House Coronavirus Task Force was never informed of this contract and was not involved in it at all.”

Cuomo’s executive order allowed the state to pay for medical supplies before an order was filled to supply the state with the desperately needed ventilators and equipment. Since then, the state has met its needs and is going through its contracts while working to build up a stockpile.

Between March 19 and April 27, the state’s health department signed 77 checks for at least $1 million to obtain medical supplies, reaching a total of $735 million, according to state records obtained by BuzzFeed News. Most payments were given to firms with little or no apparent experience in medicine, the news outlet noted.

DAWG SAYS: AS USUAL SOMEONE TOOK A LEAP INTO A CHANCE AT SOMETHING AND SOMEONE ELSE RIPPED THEM OFF.

THERE IS ALWAYS SCAMMERS AND CON MEN WHO HAVE NO CONSCIENCE DURING A CRISIS


CHP SUED FOR BANNING PROTESTS

CHP SUED FOR BANNING PROTESTS AT STATE CAPITAL DURING PANDEMIC

CHP SUED FOR BANNING PROTESTS

A new lawsuit is accusing the governor and California Highway Patrol of “abusing their power” after they banned protests at the state capitol.

The CHP made the decision after hundreds of people protested the state’s stay-at-home order last week.

In a statement issued to CBS13 on April 21, the agency said:

“In the interest of public safety and the health of all Californians during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Effective immediately the California Highway Patrol will deny any permit requests for events or activities at all state facilities.

“This is to include the State Capitol, until public health officials have determined it is safe to gather again.”

The permit for that planned protest was granted by the Capitol Protection Unit from CHP.

The governor said he thought it was allowed based on protestors staying in their cars.

The new rules are already sparking backlash and questions about free speech during a pandemic.

“There’s no case law on this. There is no precedent,” said Mark Reichel, a Sacramento attorney who has argued in the Supreme Court and is a former Vice President of the Sacramento ACLU.

Reichel said the state has a right to regulate if a protest is causing safety issues.

“It’s not the speech or the content, but its the manner in which they were going to do it the state has determined would violate the health emergency that’s going on,” Reichel said.

The lawsuit was filed by two people who had applied for permits to demonstrate but were rejected.

DAWG SAYS:IT GOES TO WHAT I KEEP ASKING ARE WE IN A MARTIAL SITUATION OR NOT.

TO MY KNOWLEDGE IT HAS NOT BEEN DECLARED.

BUT HOW ELSE DO YOU EXPLAIN THESE SUSPENSION OF CIVIL RIGHTS ACROSS THE COUNTRY?


DIPSHIDIOT OF THE DAY: AUTHOR JOHN GRISHAM

DIPSHIDIOT OF THE DAY: AUTHOR JOHN GRISHAM

Crime writer John Grisham has said America is unjustly jailing too many citizens for viewing child pornography.

In an interview with The Telegraph, Grisham, who earned $17 million last year and tied for 6th place in Forbes’ ranking of top-earning authors, attacked the widespread incarceration of those who watch child porn.

“We have prisons now filled with guys my age. Sixty-year-old white men in prison who’ve never harmed anybody, would never touch a child,” he told The Telegraph’s Peter Foster in an interview to promote his latest novel, Gray Mountain.

“But they got online one night and started surfing around, probably had too much to drink or whatever, and pushed the wrong buttons, went too far and got into child porn.”

Grisham, who is well known for legal thrillers such as A Time to Kill and The Firm, has sold more than 275 million copies since his 1989 debut.

 Grisham first joined Forbes’ top-earning author ranking in 2000, with a $36 million annual paycheck. He has made an estimated $200 million before taxes and fees in the last 14 years.

DIPSHIDIOT OF THE DAY: AUTHOR JOHN GRISHAM

“I have no sympathy for real pedophiles,” he said, speaking to The Telegraph from his office in Charlottesville, Virginia.

“God, please lock those people up. But so many of these guys do not deserve harsh prison sentences, and that’s what they’re getting.”

“There’s so many ‘sex offenders’ – that’s what they’re called – that they put them in the same prison.

Like they’re a bunch of perverts… We’ve gone nuts with this incarceration,” he added, citing an anecdote of a law-school pal who he says accidentally viewed porn that was apparently incorrectly labelled as child porn.

The U.S. has the world’s largest prison population, with about 2.2 million adults behind bars.

Close to a quarter of the world’s prisoners are held within American prisons; the U.S. accounts for just 5% of the world’s population.

According to a 2012 report by the U.S. Sentencing Commision, in the last decade average sentences for those who possess but do not produce child pornography have nearly doubled in the US, from 54 months in 2004 to 95 months in 2010. 

Commission data also shows that virtually all offenders (96.3%) possess images of minors who were prepubescent or under 12 years of age.

In a statement, Grisham apologized and said he regretted his comments, explaining: “Anyone who harms a child for profit or pleasure, or who in any way participates in child pornography—online or otherwise—should be punished to the fullest extent of the law.”

“My comments made two days ago during an interview with the British newspaper The Telegraph were in no way intended to show sympathy for those convicted of sex crimes, especially the sexual molestation of children. I can think of nothing more despicable.”

Grisham, whose 2013 release Sycamore Row sold over 1 million copies last year, also pens children’s books in the Theodore Boone series, which follows a vivacious, young wannabe-lawyer.

DAWG SAYS: I JUST KEEP SHAKING MY HEAD, IF THERE IS CHILD PORN THAN A CHILD HAS BEEN VICTIMIZED AND THE VIEWER IS ENDORSING IT……


COSTCO REQUIRES MASKS NEXT WEEK

COSTCO REQUIRES MASKS NEXT WEEK

Costco shoppers will be required to wear face masks inside the store beginning Monday, according to the company’s website.

Anyone over age 2 who doesn’t have a medical condition that prevents them from wearing a mask will be expected to have their mouth and nose covered while inside the store, the company said.

“The use of a mask or face covering should not be seen as a substitute for social distancing,” the company said.

COSTCO REQUIRES MASKS NEXT WEEK

“Please continue to observe rules regarding appropriate distancing while on Costco premises.”

Smith’s Food and Drug stores implemented a similar policy last weekend, providing masks for employees starting Sunday.

The company said in a statement that customers are encouraged to wear masks, but the masks are only a requirement for employees as of Wednesday.

DAWG SAYS: SO, MASKS REQUIRED BUT NOT UNTIL MONDAY, SO IS IT SAFE TO SAY THERE IS NO DANGER UNTIL MONDAY?

THERE ARE SO MANY THINGS I DO NOT UNDERSTAND……


POOP AND THE LOCK DOWN END

POOP AND THE LOCK DOWN END

Every day, millions of Americans could be flushing critical coronavirus data down the toilet.

With the nation growing ever more weary of sweeping stay-at-home orders and a worsening economy, some scientists say our poop could be the key to determining when a community might consider easing health restrictions.

From Stanford to the University of Arizona, from Australia to Paris, teams of researchers have been ramping up wastewater analyses to track the spread of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Initial studies show that sewage monitoring, or “wastewater-based-epidemiology,” could not only tell us how much the virus might actually be spreading in a community — but also when the virus has finally gone away.

Understanding the true scale of COVID-19 has been a major stumbling block across the country, as officials struggle with testing shortages, false negatives, and people who are infected but have no symptoms.

“With wastewater, you can very quickly get a snapshot of an entire population,” said Mariana Matus, who co-founded Biobot Analytics, a wastewater epidemiology start-up inspired by her PhD at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

“The closest approach to replicating the data from wastewater would be to literally test every single person in a community and then take the average of that. It is very powerful.”

The amount of virus detected in the sewage can, in essence, mirror the timing and scale of an outbreak in ways that more delayed (and more expensive) in-person testing cannot, experts say.

POOP AND THE LOCK DOWN END

All this information, when pieced together, is critical to informing and validating public health decisions — such as where to allocate medical supplies and when to reopen schools, restaurants and other public gathering spaces.

And as cities start loosening stay-at-home orders in the coming weeks and months, some say monitoring sewage could also provide early warnings if the virus suddenly makes a comeback.

Americans might find the idea gross, but wastewater early warning systems have helped catch norovirus, Hepatitis A and other diseases around the world for decades.

In Israel in 2013, a polio epidemic was detected in the sewage before any clinics had reported cases. This heads-up gave the government enough time to launch a vaccination campaign and contain the virus.

Not a single case of paralysis was ultimately reported.

The monitoring program, set up in 1989 by the Israeli health department, had previously detected at least four other “silent” episodes of poliovirus before clinical cases were reported.

Similarly, in Mumbai, India, researchers were able to detect poliovirus in sewage three months before any cases were observed.

In Australia, sewage monitoring is already in place to better understand patterns of illicit drug use — cocaine, methamphetamine and other substances that would otherwise be difficult to test and track.

Researchers are now looking into this approach to monitor for SARS-CoV-2.

POOP AND THE LOCK DOWN END

Similar work is happening in France, where public utility officials sampled sewage across greater Paris and confirmed a rise and fall in SARS-CoV-2 concentrations that corresponded to the shape of the outbreak.

In the Netherlands, a research team was able to detect the virus in one city’s sewage before local officials had even reported any cases of COVID-19.

As for the United States, using wastewater data to inform public health remains relatively uncharted.

A research team at Stanford University just recently received a rapid grant from the National Science Foundation to analyze wastewater samples in the Bay Area and study whether monitoring for coronavirus in treatment facilities can be used to spot early outbreaks in a community.

Back at Biobot Analytics, which spun out of MIT with the goal of scaling this approach to every city in the country, researchers started out by tracking and tracing the opioid crisis — but recently pivoted to the coronavirus.

During a one-week period in March, Matus and her team carefully identified and quantified virus particles in sewage samples from a wastewater treatment plant in Massachusetts. (Evidence so far suggests that the virus is fairly inactive by the time it’s in fecal matter, but as an extra precaution, the scientists boiled each sewage sample at 140 degrees Fahrenheit for 60 minutes.)

In a study released this month and awaiting peer review, Matus — along with researchers from MIT, Harvard University’s T. H. Chan School of Public Health and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston — reported their wastewater analysis showed a much higher number of infected people in the region than what individual clinical confirmations had shown.

POOP AND THE LOCK DOWN END

Compared to the 446 reported cases in the area, the sewage samples revealed that even by conservative estimates, at least 2,300 — and as many as 115,000 — people could have actually been infected and shedding the virus during that period in March.

There are still some kinks to work out — how much virus does each person actually shed per trip to the toilet, for example, and how do you account for rain and snow and other factors that might impact sample dilution?

But so far, Matus said, the study shows that a more routine wastewater monitoring system across the country could help cities and states be more proactive in preventing future outbreaks.

Since this pilot study in Massachusetts, hundreds of wastewater treatment facilities across the country — including more than a dozen in California — have asked Biobot to analyze their sewage.

The researchers, doing the weekly (sometimes biweekly) analysis pro bono, hope to work with as many as 10,000 facilities to create a more comprehensive picture of how the virus is spreading or “flattening” in different parts of the United States.

To preserve the natural anonymity of sewage data, Matus said that her team has only been sampling areas that represent at least several thousand people.

They’ve started sharing their findings with local public health officials and other scientists to fine-tune these methods.

Combined with clinical tests and the random antibody tests that cities have increasingly been conducting, routine wastewater analysis could help piece together a puzzle that everyone is still trying to figure out, Matus said.

Charles Gerba, a professor of microbiology at the University of Arizona who has been doing similar research in his lab, said the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the potential for this largely untapped — but critical — form of epidemiology in the United States.

“Everything ends up in the sewer,” he said. “Even herpes virus you can detect by molecular methods.”

Gerba, who has been studying coronaviruses in wastewater since the SARS outbreak, said that molecular technology today has made sewage testing much faster and relatively inexpensive — compared to traditional cell cultures from decades past that could take weeks to process.

Now with SARS-CoV-2, Gerba noticed that viral concentrations started dropping in sewage samples taken from a community that embraced stay-at-home orders.

Analyzing the sewage right now is helping officials and scientists better understand the true level of outbreak and how successfully the virus is being contained, he said.

In the coming weeks, perhaps it could help inform when social distancing measures can be relaxed.

DAWGS SAYS: THERE ARE PLENTY OF SAMPLES IN SAN FRANCISCO THAT CAN BE HAD FOR THE TAKING…….


NEWS OF THE WEIRD

NEWS OF THE WEIRD

2015
A Florida candidate for US Senate has come under criticism after it emerged that he once killed a goat and drank its blood.

Augustus Sol Invictus admits he “sacrificed” the animal as part of a pagan ritual, but it was not “sadistic” as some of his critics have alleged.

The Libertarian Party candidate is unlikely to win the seat.

Adrian Wyllie, the state party’s chairman, has resigned to draw attention to Invictus’ candidacy.

In 2013, Invictus walked from central Florida to the Mojave Desert and spent a week there fasting.

When he returned to Florida, he killed the goat to give thanks.

“I did sacrifice a goat. I know that’s probably a quibble in the mind of most Americans,” he told the Associated Press news agency.

“I sacrificed an animal to the god of the wilderness … Yes, I drank the goat’s blood.”

NEWS OF THE WEIRD

‘Fascist’
Mr Wyllie said Invictus holds extreme views and brutally dismembered the goat.

“He’s a self-proclaimed fascist. He’s promoting a second civil war,” Mr Wyllie said. “This guy has no place in the Libertarian Party.”

Mr Wyllie, who unsuccessfully ran as a Libertarian for the governor of Florida last year, fears the Invictus campaign will stunt the party’s recent gains.

Invictus called Mr Wyllie’s allegations a “smear campaign”. He said although white supremacists support his candidacy, he is not a racist.

The 32-year-old lawyer changed his name to the Latin phrase that means “majestic unconquered sun”. He declined to tell a reporter his old name.

NEWS OF THE WEIRD

FEBRUARY 2020

A South Carolina judge ruled Wednesday that police and prosecutors did not have probable cause in the arrest of a Florida white nationalist in South Carolina who was accused of kidnapping his wife at gunpoint.

The judge dismissed that charge.

However, charges of domestic violence of a high and aggravated nature and possession of a gun during a violent crime remain pending against Augustus Sol Invictus, court testimony showed.

Invictus is a former U.S.. senate candidate from Florida whom police have said in court has made online postings about violence.

DAWG SAYS: YES THERE ARE SOME WEIRD PEOPLE OUT THERE THESE DAYS




THE DEATH OF JEFF MOORE

THE DEATH OF JEFF MOORE
DID NOT HAVE COVID BUT IT KILLED HIM ANYWAY

The last thing Jeff Moore said was his husband’s name.

“Richard!” he shouted as he collapsed in his North Las Vegas shower early April 21.

Richard Davis, 63, ran to his aid. He tried to call 911, but his phone was off — he had been teaching a public health class over Zoom for Dignity Health, St. Rose Dominican Hospital. It felt like an eternity, booting it back up.

He administered CPR. But even after paramedics took over, and then Centennial Hills Hospital staff, Moore never regained a heartbeat.

“I wish I had said, ‘I love you, I love you, I love you,’ instead of ‘one, two, three,’ ” Davis told the Las Vegas Review-Journal this week.

THE DEATH OF JEFF MOORE IN LAS VEGAS

Deadly delay

Moore did not test positive for the coronavirus.

“But it killed him just the same,” Davis said.

That’s because Moore — who was diagnosed in August with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a lung disease with no discernible cause — was in need of a double lung transplant.

On March 23, he was supposed to travel to the USC Transplant Institute in California for a preliminary appointment to determine how suitable he would be for the procedure.

At 55, Moore was bedridden because of the disease and managed diabetes, but he was otherwise in good health and considered a good candidate, Davis said.

But his appointment never happened. Because of the pandemic, California hospitals were prohibited from performing elective procedures, which included Moore’s appointment.

A new appointment was scheduled for May 12 — a date Moore never lived to see.

“When I went in to see his body, I expected him to look dead,” Davis said. “But he didn’t. He looked handsome. It was so hard.”

A technician covered him in purple brocade — his favorite color.

When Davis returned home a few hours later, alone and in shock, he realized he had a missed a call from a California number. He listened to the voicemail.

It was USC, calling to say they would like to move Moore’s appointment up — California Gov. Gavin Newsom was set to lift the state’s elective procedures ban the next day.

THE DEATH OF JEFF MOORE IN LAS VEGAS

Tripped into love

In life, Moore was a “big talker,” his husband said.

It was necessary for his longtime job at Connections Housing, a meeting planning service, where he worked to accommodate thousands of Las Vegas convention guests over the years.

As a teen, Moore was a champion roller skater in Southern California. More recently, he was an avid bowler. Davis didn’t bowl much himself, but he would often watch Moore, cheering him on.

The couple first met at Metropolitan Community Church in Las Vegas, when Davis tripped and literally fell into Moore’s lap.

“He has often had to pick me up ever since,” Davis said of his husband.

Moore loved Harry Potter, tie-dye shirts, fast cars and the couple’s “children” — their big cat Dale, cockatiel Ricky and chihuahuas Benji and Zoey.

The animals often cozied up on Davis’ lap, “but as soon as Jeff came into the room, they were like, ‘zoom,’ over to him,” Davis said.

“Even the bird would fly off my shoulder,” he laughed.

Last morning

Their last morning together was normal, even routine. Moore was not working for the time being, and Davis was permitted to work from home amid the pandemic.

So Davis made his husband oatmeal, and the two caught up on the news together — Davis reading the paper, and Moore watching CNN.

“I knew he was seriously ill,” Davis said of that morning. “I knew unless he got that transplant it wasn’t going to be long. But — not today, I thought. Not today.”

After breakfast, he turned up Moore’s oxygen so he could shower, which he had done by himself before, and instructed him to “tell me if you need anything.” Then Davis got to work.

“This is affecting so many people beyond those who are directly suffering and dying from COVID, which is horrible enough,” Davis told the Review-Journal.

He asked that, in these difficult times, people still consider those like his intuitive, smart and loving husband, Jeff.

“Who knows how many others have died,” Davis said.

DAWG SAYS: WE CURRENTLY HAVE MANY HEALTH PERSONNELL BEING FURLOUGHED OR LAID OFF DUE TO NO WORK AT THE HOSPITALS.

THEY HAVE CANCELLED ALL “ELECTIVE” PROCEDURES, AND HOW MANY HAVE DIED DUE TO THIS NONSENSE. DID THEY THINK ALL OTHER LIFE TAKING ISSUES WOULD JUST GO AWAY?

BUT THERE IS MONEY TO MADE ON STRICTLY COVID ISSUES, PEOPLE ARE DYING FROM MANY THINGS AND BEING CLASSIFIED AS COVID FOR THE $$$$.

MY THOUGHTS GO OUT TO MR. MOORES HUSBAND.



ONE PERSON FEELS IT IS NOT BIDEN

ONE PERSON FEELS IT IS NOT BIDEN

A long-time observer of Washington, D.C. politics has a theory about Democratic nominee Joe Biden:
He is just a place holder for bigger, bolder plans for the party.


Rick Manning, who leads Americans for Limited Government, is not the first political observer to predict the ailing Biden, 77, will not be the nominee, but Manning speculates it is virtually certain the party will perform a switcheroo when the time is right.

In the interview on American Family Radio, Manning said Democrats were already concerned about Biden’s mental abilities and then came sexual assault accusations from Tara Reade, a former Biden staffer who claims the then-senator sexually assaulted her in 1993.

Both accusations will end Biden’s candidacy, Manning told show host Sandy Rios, even though it appears prominent Democrats are jumping on board to endorse him — most recently, the 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton.

“And then between June 1 and July 4,” Manning said, “they’ll be shocked to discover there are credible charges against Biden and, oh by the way, there’s real questions over whether or not he can handle the job and he’s just declined. And so, at that point, they’ll pick who they want.”

Reade versus ‘Believe All Women’

Biden’s odd behavior on the campaign trail, from bullying voters to giving meandering speeches, has drawn both ridicule and pity from political observers. But his continuous actions have gone unnoticed, at least publicly, by many prominent Democrats.

In his latest gaffe, Biden warned about “economic intercourse around the world” if the Trump administration continues its “America First” policy.

The sexual accusations from Reade are more troublesome for Biden, however, since Democrats scorched then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh over allegations he assaulted Christine Blasey Ford when they were teenagers in the 1980s.

Blasey Ford (pictured) was lauded as a feminist hero for testifying about the alleged assault before the U.S. Senate, and female Democrats all but dared male Republican lawmakers to accuse her of lying. That tactic largely worked, even though Ford’s vague accusations were considered weak evidence. 

“We are here to stand in support of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford,” House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters, “and to applaud her courage as she prepares to tell her story.”

Kavanaugh, meanwhile, was urged by Democrats to withdraw his nomination and told he had to prove his innocence against her allegations.

Nobody wants to be ‘holdout’

In the AFR interview, show host Sandy Rios told Manning she, too, had expected Biden to drop out but it appears he will be the nominee, especially with so many prominent names endorsing him.

Manning suggested, however, that fellow Democrats must publicly back Biden now so they can point back to their support for him when the moment comes to toss him aside.

Manning’s description of Democrats’ sneaky, cynical political strategy drew a laugh from Rios.

“Okay, that makes sense,” she replied.

So who will be the nominee? Manning said Andrew Cuomo, New York’s governor, is the most likely name even after saying he doesn’t want the nomination.

DAWG SAYS: WHO CARES? IF BIDEN IS THEIR BEST LET’S BRING IT ON AND SEE WHO COMES OUT ON TOP.

JUST MORE DRAMA BY SOMEONE LOOKING FOR ATTENTION.


CSU SUED BY STUDENTS

CSU SUED BY STUDENTS
LAWSUIT: CALIFORNIA OWES VIRUS RELATED REFUNDS


The California State University and the University of California systems were sued Monday by students demanding refunds because of some campus fees, since the virus pandemic closed schools.

The class-action lawsuits, filed in federal courts in Los Angeles and Oakland, say that the systems that serve more than 700,000 students have refused to refund unused portions of fees for campus-related services that spring-semester students aren’t using, such as health facilities, student association dues and student centers.

The campuses have been closed since March because of the COVID-19 outbreak and athletic events have been cancelled.

“The effect of CSU’s COVID-19-related protocols and messaging is that all students have effectively been forced to leave campus, unless they truly had no other safe place to go,” the Los Angeles suit said.

“For students who do remain on campus, services are now extremely limited. For students who do not live on campus, there is no reason to come to campus, since all activities have been cancelled.”

Messages seeking comment from both systems weren’t immediately returned Monday night.

The fees ranged from around $850 to more than $4,000 for CSU students for the 2019-2020 academic year while the UC basic student services fee was around $1,100, while fees related to specific campuses doubled that or more, according to the lawsuits.

CSU SUED BY STUDENTS FOR REQUIRED FEES

“It is improper for them to attempt to retain what amounts to many millions of dollars in aggregate in campus fees they collected from their students, even though they terminated the services that these fees covered,” said Adam Levitt, one of the lawyers filing the suits.

“A college education is already a monumental expense for students and their families, and to essentially offer them no relief on these material expenditures, particularly during a time when millions of Americans are struggling financially, is not only tone-deaf but unfair and unlawful.”

Similar lawsuits have been filed in other areas of the country

DAWG SAYS: THERE ARE A LOT OF THINGS I DON’T AGREE WITH THESE STUDENTS LIKE NOT PAYING LOANS BACK, BUT THIS ONE I GO ALONG WITH.

IF THEY ARE PAYING FOR ON CAMPUS SERVICES OR FUNCTIONS OR REQUIREMENTS AND THEY CANNOT GO TO CAMPUS PAY THEM BACK.

CSU HAS A LONG HISTORY OF SAVING AND HIDING MONEY FOR THEIR RAINY DAYS FUNDS THEY CAN FORK IT OVER.


WOMENS VOTE ALMOST NEVER HAPPENED

WOMENS VOTE ALMOST NEVER HAPPENED

A pandemic nearly derailed the women’s suffrage movement

Women overcame influenza, social distancing,
and political bias to win the right to vote.

“These are sad times for the whole world, grown unexpectedly sadder by the sudden and sweeping epidemic of influenza,” wrote Carrie Chapman Catt, president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, in a letter to supporters in 1918.

“This new affliction is bringing sorrow into many suffrage homes and is presenting a serious new obstacle in our Referendum campaigns and in the Congressional and Senatorial campaigns,” she continued. “We must therefore be prepared for failure.”

Suffragists had been fighting for women’s right to vote for 70 years, and victory seemed almost in reach.

Even with the United States fully mobilized for World War I. President Woodrow Wilson had come out in support of a constitutional amendment, and the House of Representatives had passed it.

Then the Spanish flu struck, and the leaders of one of the longest-running political movements in the country’s history had to figure out how to continue their campaign in the midst of the deadliest pandemic in modern times. (See how some cities ‘flattened the curve’ of the flu pandemic.)

The first wave of the flu coursed through the country in the spring of 1918, ebbing by summertime.

During that period, the Senate, dominated by southern Democrats determined to stop the enfranchisement of African-American women, was refusing to pass the bill to send the suffrage amendment to the states for ratification.

Votes were announced twice, then canceled. By early fall, suffragists could see that they were two votes short of the necessary two-thirds for passage.

Finding those two senators was proving impossible. Maud Wood Park, the chief suffrage lobbyist, wrote to her husband that she felt “as if I were trying to swim in a whirlpool” and that it was taking “every ounce of thought and energy in me.”

Something else needed to be done to break through.

November would see a mid-term election in which a battle between Democrats and Republicans for control of Congress loomed. Suffragists plunged into this tense atmosphere with two lines of attack.

First, they would try to gain full voting rights in a few more states, where referendums would be held. (Twelve states had already granted women full voting rights.) They selected Oklahoma, Louisiana, South Dakota, and Michigan.

If they succeeded, the votes of many more women would be added to pressure Congress to act. Second, they identified four suffrage opponents in the Senate who were up for reelection and whose challengers had pledged to support the federal amendment.


WOMENS VOTE ALMOST NEVER HAPPENED

‘Chained to her bed’

But in September the flu came roaring back, eventually killing some 675,000 people in the U.S. and 50 million worldwide. Boston and Philadelphia were hit very hard, followed by Washington, D.C., where large numbers of wartime government workers were jam-packed in inadequate housing.

In Congress, Champ Clark, the powerful Speaker of the House, caught the flu. In the Senate, where the suffrage bill languished, the galleries from which suffragists kept an eye on proceedings were closed.

Then the U.S. Public Health Service issued a nationwide advisory to local health departments to prohibit large meetings and gatherings.

Suffragists’ election campaigns were immediately compromised. Organizers had to postpone a train tour of previously arrested suffrage protestors, which had been expected to draw great crowds along its route from Washington, D.C., to Oregon.

On the second floor of Suffrage House in the nation’s capital, Carrie Chapman Catt was “chained to her bed” by the flu. Nonetheless, she was determined to consult on strategy with a close ally of the president, Montana Senator John Walsh, but he too was stricken with the flu.

Catt couldn’t come downstairs, and Walsh couldn’t go up, so an intermediary shuttled between them to conduct their confidential discussion.

By this time, the pandemic was moving west from the ravaged cities on the Atlantic seaboard. The referendum state of South Dakota sustained a heavy blow.

“Just when we had plans developed for a renewed and revised campaign,” a local organizer wrote, “along comes the influenza and cuts off all possibility of public speaking and even meetings in open air.

So many homes have been touched in each locality, if not with the actual disease, with the dreadful fear which seems to be worse, that we have not been able to work with the individual voter.”

Raising money was impossible, and many suffrage workers were volunteering for the Red Cross or in hospitals.

Faced by bans on public gatherings, suffragists switched to the personal touch, reaching out directly to neighbors and friends.

They emphasized their patriotism and quoted the president saying that votes for women was a proper reward for their wartime sacrifice.

National headquarters provided more than a million pamphlets for distribution door to door and 300 weekly bulletins for placement in local newspapers. Women signed petitions urging male voters to pass the four states’ referendums.

‘Not politically safe’

More than anything, though, it was the extensive grassroots organizing suffragists had perfected that carried them through. They’d been laying the basis for their campaigns long before the influenza barreled in.

Cities and towns in each state had their own organizations, linked to national strategy. Local women had developed sophisticated political skills. They knew how to identify opportunities and overcome obstacles—South Dakota and Michigan had already held several referendums. All that preparation was crucial.

The epidemic suppressed voter turnout, with three million fewer ballots cast than in the 1914 mid-term election. Nonetheless, the suffrage referendums in Michigan, South Dakota, and Oklahoma passed, each with a comfortable margin.

Gratitude for the role women played during the war and now in the pandemic influenced the results. With so many physicians serving in the armed forces, nurses became the front line of care for the sick.

Only the Louisiana referendum failed. This was the first in the South, a region where women’s suffrage had been doomed by the overwhelming fear of African-American women voting. The state campaign, led by women who opposed national coordination and strategy, didn’t produce the energy, determination, and enthusiasm that brought victory elsewhere in the face of the flu crisis.

Back in the East, where suffragists campaigned to replace senate opponents, the pandemic had largely abated, and they confronted a more conventional obstacle: entrenched party power. Their biggest challenge, their most impressively organized campaign, and their greatest win was against Massachusetts Senator John Weeks, a Republican who was widely considered invincible.

In Delaware, Democratic Senator Willard Saulsbury, Jr., part of the powerful DuPont family, was also defeated. “The election has taught beyond dispute,” a Chattanooga paper editorialized, “that opposition to suffrage is not politically safe for either party.”

Women in New York state, whose constitution had been amended to grant them full voting rights the year before, showed up at the polls in large numbers in the 1918 election. Catt, still recovering from the flu, insisted on going to cast her ballot—her first. Elsewhere in the state, in an ironic post-influenza achievement, women’s votes helped elect Grace Norris, a doctor who battled against the virus, as the country’s first female coroner.

On November 22, 1918, World War I ended. The flu delivered one more punch during the winter, which weakened President Wilson. Republicans won control of both houses of the new Congress, and in early June 1919, the Senate finally passed the suffrage bill, 18 months after the House. Now it was time for the next battle: to get three-quarters of the states to ratify the amendment.

For the next 15 months, suffragists fought hard for ratification in the necessary 36 states. In February 1920, suffragist Aloysius Larch-Miller, ill with the flu, got out of her sick bed to testify before the Oklahoma Democratic Party convention on behalf of ratification. She won the argument, only to die of pneumonia. Months after the flu had abated, the pandemic had claimed its suffrage martyr.

Finally, Tennessee pushed the 19th Amendment across the finish line, and on August 26, 1920, women’s suffrage was inscribed into the U.S. Constitution.


UNDERWATER AL STILL TRYING

UNDERWATER AL STILL TRYING

SAYING CLIMATE CRISIS AND THE VIRUS “LINKED” POLLUTION MAKES PRECONDITIONS WORSE

Former Vice President Al Gore (D) said Monday that the climate crisis and issues surrounding environmental injustice are linked with the coronavirus pandemic.

“This climate crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic are linked in some ways,” Gore said on MSNBC.

“The preconditions that raise the death rate from COVID-19, a great many of them, are accentuated, made worse by the fossil fuel pollution.”

Emerging statistics have illustrated that the coronavirus pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on communities of color.

Gore said the crisis has “exposed some longstanding weaknesses” in the country.

UNDERWATER AL STILL TRYING

For example, Gore noted the death rate, before the pandemic, among black children from asthma was much worst than for which children with asthma.

According to the U.S. Department for Health and Human Services, in 2015 African American children with asthma had a death rate 10 times that of non-Hispanic white children.

And black children are four times as more likely to be admitted to the hospital for asthma as compared to non-Hispanic white children.

Gore said environmental injustice is just one factor, in addition to inadequate access to healthcare and unequal economics, that leads to the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 and other health issues.

Communities of color have had “a legacy of being deprived of the same political and economic power to defend themselves” they’re more likely to be in polluted areas.

Such as “downwind from the smokestacks” or “downstream from the hazardous waste flows,” Gore said.

“This is now being manifested in these horrendous death rates,” he said.

Gore also criticized President Trump‘s handling of the crisis.

“He ignored the science as he has done with the climate crisis, as well,” Gore said.

“He has engaged in a kind of magical thinking. He’s pushed dangerous and potentially deadly snake oil type remedies.”

Gore urged Americans to push aside partisanship when thinking about the November election.

“I hope that a lot of people will put the country first and try, even in this time of extreme partisanship, to try and set that aside and look at what is at stake here,” Gore said.

“I mean seriously we are really in trouble with the kind of performance in the Oval Office we’ve had.

We’ve got to change that … I know that sounds partisan but it’s more than that, it’s way more than that.”

DAWG SAYS: ACCORDING TO AL GORE ARENT WE SUPPOSED TO BE UNDERWATER BY NOW?