SCOTUS RULES ON ELECTORATE

Supreme Court rules ‘faithless electors’ can’t go rogue at Electoral College

SCOTUS RULES ON ELECTORATE THEY HAVE TO FOLLOW LAW

Colorado elector Micheal Baca, second from left, voted for John Kasich in 2016, instead of Hilary Clinton, who the popular vote in Colorado, in Denver in Dec. 19, 2016.

SCOTUS RULES ON ELECTORATE THEY HAVE TO FOLLOW LAW

The 538 people who cast the actual votes for president in December as part of the Electoral College are not free agents.

And must vote as the laws of their states direct, the Supreme Court ruled Monday.

The unanimous decision in the “faithless elector” case was a defeat for advocates of changing the Electoral College.

Some hoped a win would force a shift in the method of electing presidents toward a nationwide popular vote.

But it was a win for state election officials who feared that empowering rogue electors would cause chaos.

Writing for the court, Justice Elena Kagan said the Constitution gives states far-reaching authority over choosing presidential electors.

That includes the power to set conditions on an elector’s appointment, “that is to say, what the elector must do for the appointment to take effect.”

What’s more, she wrote, “nothing in the Constitution expressly prohibits states from taking away president electors’ voting discretion.

” The ruling aligns with “the trust of a nation that here, We the People rule,” Kagan said.


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