CALIFORNIA INMATE RELEASES CAUSE DVI TO CLOSE

CALIFORNIA INMATE RELEASES CAUSE DVI TO CLOSE

California to Close Prison Amid Declining Inmate Numbers

California next year will close a prison holding about 1,500 male inmates, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration said Friday in its latest step to reduce the state’s incarceration footprint partly in response to the coronavirus and massive related budget cuts.

Shuttering the 67-year-old Deuel Vocational Institution in Tracy, in the Central Valley east of San Francisco, will save about $182 million annually, state corrections officials said.

Newsom had called for closing a prison even before the pandemic devastated the state’s budget, once calling it a “core value” of his administration. He expects to close a second prison in coming years, although lawmakers want to advance that timetable.

CALIFORNIA INMATE RELEASES CAUSE DVI TO CLOSE

A series of new laws and ballot measures over nearly a decade significantly shrunk what once was the nation’s largest state prison population. Newsom also approved the earlier releases of more than 10,000 inmates in response to the pandemic. He opposes a measure on the November ballot that could roll back some of the criminal justice changes and keep more inmates in prison longer.

The location has prompted lobbying and speculation, with some lawmakers pushing to close San Quentin State Prison, the state’s oldest prison that sits on high-value shore-front property north of San Francisco, or the antiquated California Rehabilitation Center in Norco, east of Los Angeles.

Prison officials said the Tracy prison’s relatively low number of inmates helped prompt that choice, while its nearly 1,100 employees may be able to transfer to other prisons in Stockton or the Sacramento area.

Democratic Assemblyman Phil Ting of San Francisco, who heads the Assembly Budget Committee, said closing the Tracy prison “fits the criteria” set by lawmakers and will also avoid $800 million for repairs.

The prison — California’s sixth oldest — is expected to close by Sept. 30, 2021, and the state’s current budget calls for closing a second unspecified prison in 2022.

The union representing state correctional officers did not immediately comment.

But the move was hailed by Jay Jordan, executive director of Californians for Safety and Justice, which seeks prison alternatives.

He, like Ting, said spending billions of dollars on prisons is wasteful and “takes money away from prevention, schools and economic development.”

Officials said the last time California closed a state prison was the Northern California Women’s Facility in Stockton in 2003.

A bill awaiting Newsom’s signature would also phase out the state’s remaining juvenile prisons.

DAWG SAYS: THIS WAS A PROCESS BY CALIFORNIA

TO HAVE DECLINING PRISON NUMBERS BY RELEASING INMATES DESPITE THEIR CRIMES AND SENTENCES HANDED DOWN.

SO THEY CAN CLOSE PRISONS THEY DO NOT BELIEVE IN.

WE NEED TO BUILD A WALL AROUND CALIFORNIA.


CALIFORNIA INMATES HOUSED BY GENDER IDENTITY

CALIFORNIA INMATES HOUSED BY GENDER IDENTITY

Newsom signs law allowing transgender inmates to be placed in prison by their gender identity

CALIFORNIA INMATES HOUSED BY GENDER IDENTITY


The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) will now house inmates based on their gender identity rather than their sex assigned at birth – but only if the state does not have “management or security concerns” with individual inmates.

The law Newsom signed Saturday requires officers to ask inmates privately during the intake process if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex, then inmates can request to be placed in a facility that houses either men or women.

The CDCR cannot deny requests solely because of inmates’ anatomy or sexual orientation. When a request is denied, the state must provide a written statement to the inmate explaining the decision and give them an opportunity to object.

“California has some of the strongest pro LGBTQ+ laws in the nation and with the bills signed today, our march toward equality takes an additional step forward,” Newsom said in a statement.

“These new laws will help us better understand the impacts of COVID-19 on the LGBTQ+ community, establish a new fund to support our transgender sisters and brothers and advance inclusive and culturally competent efforts that uphold the dignity of all Californians, regardless of who you are or who you love.”

Similar laws protecting transgender inmates exist in Rhode Island, New York City and Massachusetts.


CONGRESSMAN ARRESTED AT PROTEST

CONGRESSMAN ARRESTED AT PROTEST

Kentucky state Rep. Attica Scott

Kentucky’s Representative Attica Scott Arrested During Breonna Taylor Protest

Rep. Attica Scott, the only Black woman in Kentucky’s House of Representatives, was released from jail on Friday morning after being arrested during protests against this week’s grand jury decision on the police killing of Breonna Taylor.

Scott, 48, called felony rioting charges levied against her “ridiculous” and “absurd,” The Louisville Courier-Journal
reported.

CONGRESSMAN ARRESTED AT PROTEST ON FELONY CHARGES

The lawmaker was arrested with a group of people who were accused by police of starting a fire at the Louisville Public Library, according to WAVE 3. Scott told the Courier-Journal she was “disgusted and offended” by the accusation that she’d start a fire at the library, pointing out it’s located in the district she represents.

On Friday, Scott posted a video to her Instagram account which documents the eight minutes leading up to her arrest and shows her with a group of others walking peacefully around the downtown area. In the footage, the group asks police where they should walk as they head towards sanctuary at a local church.


DEMOCRATS WANT TO IMPEACH EVERYONE

DEMOCRATS WANT TO IMPEACH EVERYONE

Emergency’ investigation:

House Democrats threaten to impeach AG Barr

Democrats are turning up the heat on William P. Barr, accusing the attorney general of trying to influence the November presidential election and threatening impeachment after he gave a fiery speech last week lambasting career federal prosecutors.

The chairs of four House committees urged the Justice Department’s internal watchdog to open an “emergency” investigation into whether Mr. Barr is using U.S. Attorney John Durham‘s Russia probe as part of an effort to taint the presidential election.

In a letter Friday to Justice Department Inspector General Michael E. Horowitz, the four lawmakers said Mr. Barr‘s comments and actions could be damaging “to public confidence in the integrity of the DOJ and our democratic process.”