SEX ED IN WASHINGTON STATE

SEX ED IN WASHINGTON STATE

Sex education referendum first of its kind

Voters in the state of Washington will soon decide the fate of a sex education program.

The program being voted on in November is a first-of-its-kind mandate for an education subject in Washington. The Evergreen State does not mandate core curriculum such as math, English, or science, but this comprehensive sex education program is required for public school students K-12.

“We’re taking a one-size-fits-all approach to comprehensive sex ed and standards that have been essentially written by some unelected, unaccountable bureaucrats within our central office of the superintendent of public instruction in Olympia,” says Mindi Wirth of Parents for Safe Schools, an organization that gathered signatures for the referendum.

Wirth would rather see parental and local community involvement in decisions involving curriculum.

“The other components here that are also problematic for voters is the curriculum itself,” she adds. “There are topics that are covered that are very problematic to a number of people across Washington, and we are introducing the concept of affirmative consent at an age younger than by statute we consider the age of consent in Washington state.”

There is an opt-out for students whose parents do not want them involved in this curriculum, but Wirth’s organization also takes issue with that approach.

SEX ED IN WASHINGTON STATE SCHOOLS TO BE VOTED ON

“This idea [that] you can just opt out is also troubling, because that means then that kids that end up getting opted out because their parents have objections or concerns with the content of the curriculum are getting no sex ed, and we don’t want that either,” she says, adding that Parents for Safe Schools is not an abstinence-only organization and that the majority of schools in the state are already teaching some form of sex education.

Planned Parenthood, the American Civil Liberties Union, and the Washington state teachers’ union are among the groups who support the comprehensive program.

Courtney Normand, director of a Planned Parenthood-affiliated political group in the state, told Associated Press her organization did not mobilize during the referendum petition drive because of the pandemic. They were dismayed that the opposition’s in-person signature gathering took place despite Governor Jay Inslee’s (D) stay-at-home order.

“It seems to be a political, partisan turnout goal rather than really an intention about student safety,” Normand said.

“We focused very heavily on getting petitions out in the mail,” asserts Wirth. “We started with that, and then Washington Catholic Conference made an announcement … basically supporting signature gathering for Referendum 90 at churches in the parking lot.”

Following that announcement, tents were set up at Catholic churches, and people would just show up, drive through, get a petition, sign it, “and our signature gatherers would wear masks and sanitize pens, although they often advertised as ‘bring your own pen,'” Wirth adds.

On the ballot in November, the referendum will reveal the bill’s language and then ask, “Should this measure be rejected or approved?'”

“We are telling people …  to reject it, because by rejecting it, it essentially means you are not acting on behalf of a lawmaker in saying I would not have voted for this bill if I was serving in the legislature,” Wirth concludes.

According to Kiro7, this referendum marks the first time in the country that such a decision on sex ed will be decided by voters.


CALIFORNIA CHURCH FIGHTING NEWSOM IN COURT

CALIFORNIA CHURCH FIGHTING NEWSOM IN COURT

A California church continues its legal fight against what it calls unconstitutional orders.

The case involving Harvest Rock Church and Harvest Rock International Ministry is currently at the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals after a district judge ruled against an emergency injunction.

CALIFORNIA CHURCH FIGHTING NEWSOM IN COURT

Liberty Counsel, which is representing the ministry, appealed to the Ninth Circuit after Judge Jesus Bernal ruled against the injunction that sought to allow the church to remain open while Harvest Rock fights Gov. Gavin Newsom and his lockdown orders.

Liberty Counsel attorney Mat Stav says there is “zero worship” going on at Harvest Church, located in Pasadena, as well as 162 other satellite church congregations located across the state.

“I’m talking about no one can gather together for worship,” Staver explains. “And that even includes Bible studies and home fellowship in their life groups, (so) you can’t even have somebody in your home that doesn’t live there.”

Violators face a criminal charge punishable by up to a year in prison.

Staver tells OneNewsNow the pastor has received a warning letter from a prosecutor threatening criminal charges that would apply to the pastor, church staff, and anyone who attends a service.

Californians are witnessing the state and local governments threaten church worship at the same time their liberal governor has praised – and defended – the tens of thousands who have marched in the streets in recent months to demand racial justice and police reform.

“The virus doesn’t discriminate between religious and non-religious gatherings,” Staver says, “but Gov. Newsom clearly does and that’s a problem with the First Amendment.”


COURT RULES AGAIN ABOUT TRANSGENDER LOCKEROOM

COURT RULES AGAIN ABOUT TRANSGENDER LOCKEROOM

Another court ruling opens another locker room for opposite sex

A federal appeals court has ruled on behalf of a female high school student, who lives as a male, who sued after she was separated from the all-male swim team and its locker room.

The ruling by the Minnesota Court of Appeals against the Anoka-Hennepin School District scored another legal victory for the pro-transgender movement that is backed by homosexual rights groups and legal groups such as the ACLU.

“I never want any student to experience the discrimination and cruelty I experienced from the adults at my school,” the female student, identified in court documents as N.H., said in a statement released by the ACLU of Minnesota.

The push to welcome opposite-sex athletes onto sports teams, and hence in their locker rooms, has been witnessed for years by Steve McConkey, a veteran track and field athlete who operates 4 WINDS Christian Athletics. 

“Really what this is about,” he tells OneNewsNow, “is just pushing the transgender movement on people…into accepting the LGBT movement.”

COURT RULES AGAIN ABOUT TRANSGENDER LOCKEROOM

And that push has scored numerous success stories in recent years. Accused of “discrimination” and “inequality,” public school districts were threatened by the Obama administration to comply with pro-transgender demands or risk losing federal fundings. Those demands have been reversed by the Trump administration which recently sided with high school girls in Connecticut who are suing to keep biological boys — who have dominated the female competitors — off their all-girls track teams.

Some public schools tried to accomodate the then-new demands by transgender students by allowing them to use a single-sex restroom, for example, only to learn from an ACLU attorney that was “discrimination” to do so.

Back in Minnesota, the Anoka-Hennepin School District attempted a similar tactic when it gave “N.H.” what The Associated Press called a “segregated” locker room. The student sued the district last year.

“Today’s decision makes it very clear,” N.H. said, “that segregating trans students doesn’t just dehumanize us, it violates our legal rights.”

DAWG SAYS: THE COURTS CONTINUE TO RULE IN FAVOR OF THE RIGHTS OF ONE PERSON AND NOT THE OTHERS AFFECTED.