HUNTER BIDEN INVESTIGATION REPORT

HUNTER BIDEN INVESTIGATION REPORT

HERE IS THE SENATE COMITTEE INVESTIGATION REPORT DATED 9-18-2020

U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland
Security and Governmental Affairs
U.S. Senate Committee on Finance
Majority Staff Report

READ FOR YOURSELF


MISS THE MOVIES AMC HAS OFFER

MISS THE MOVIES AMC HAS OFFER

AMC will rent you a theater for $99. Here’s what to know

MISS THE MOVIES? AMC HAS OFFER FOR YOU

The coronavirus pandemic has not been kind to movie theaters.

At the onset, theaters across the country closed, movie releases were rolled back and popcorn was left uneaten. But if you’re anxious to get back in front of the big screen, AMC Theatres has some very good news: It’s hosting private screenings.

AMC locations across the U.S. are renting out their theaters for private showings from a list of 17 movies, the company said on its website.

The best part? Pricing starts at $99.

Each screening is capped at 20 people and masks are required for everyone in attendance, AMC said.

Pricing for new blockbusters such as “Tenet” and “The New Mutants” starts at $149.

You can see the full film lineup here.

USE ONLINE FORM TO TO BOOK

To book a theater, fill out this online form with your preferred date, time and film. You’ll also be able to choose your location from the list of participating AMC theaters.

The move comes just days after the Kansas-based chain told investors it could run out of cash by the end of 2020, The Kansas City Star reported. AMC said it was suffering due to delayed film releases.

AMC theaters are still closed in California, Maryland, New York, North Carolina and Washington State, which includes some of the company’s most profitable locations, according to The Star.

But AMC isn’t the only theater giant struggling.

Earlier this month, Cineworld Group, the parent company of Regal Cinemas, announced it would temporarily close all 536 Regal locations in the U.S. after news broke that the latest James Bond installment “No Time to Die” was delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic, McClatchy News previously reported.


Cineworld said it needed blockbusters to give theatergoers “the breadth of strong commercial films necessary for them to consider coming back to theaters against the backdrop of COVID-19,” according to McClatchy.

The company said it would monitor the situation and announce reopenings once there’s more “concrete guidance” in key markets.

DAWG SAYS: I PERSONALLY DO NOT GO TO THE MOVIES UNLESS IT IS NOT THE MAINSTREAM HOLLYWOOD CRAP.

I REFUSE TO ENDORSE SELF ABSORBED MILLIONAIRES THAT THINK THEY CAN TELL YOU HOW TO LIVE WHEN THEY ARE SO SCREWED UP THEMSELES.

ENGAGE IN MOVIES FROM THE SUNANCE FESTIVAL AND THE LIKE TO SUPPORT YOUNG NEWCOMERS, THEY ARE TOO NEW (HOPEFULLY) TO BE CORRUPTED BY THE INDUSTRY.


 

NAZI POLICE RECRUIT FIRED

NAZI POLICE RECRUIT FIRED

Chief: Indiana police recruit fired for ties to neo-Nazis

A police recruit in northwestern Indiana was fired less than 24 hours after the department was notified that the officer was involved in a neo-Nazi online chat forum.

The Lafayette Police Department launched an investigation into Joseph Zacharek, who was hired in June, after being notified on Twitter Friday evening of his possible participation in a chat forum called Iron March in 2016.

The department’s internal affairs division concluded the information was “accurate and credible,” and Zacharek was terminated, according to a Saturday news release from Chief Patrick Flannelly.

The chat forum disbanded in 2017, but its posts were leaked online late last year, according to the Lafayette Journal & Courier.

Flannelly told the newspaper that Zacharek was called into the station Friday and admitted the comments were his. He was fired by noon the next day.

“Officer Zacharek’s comments were not in harmony with the spirit of cooperation and inclusion in the community that the Lafayette Police Department values,” Flannelly said in the release.

The department said that Zacharek had been in training and had “no exposure to the public.”

The department acknowledged that it did not discover the information prior to hiring Zacharek despite conducting “very thorough and complete background investigations on potential employees,” which includes a review of social media accounts, according to the statement.

Flannelly told the newspaper the department would review its background check processes.

DAWG SAYS: DOES NOT SOUND LIKE MUCH OF A BACKGROUND CHECK.


A TIP TO FIND LOST DOG

A TIP TO FIND LOST DOG

If your dog takes off in a panic when they are in unfamiliar terrain it may take them a good while to stop panicking and running. By the time they calm down they may be completely lost. If you have to stop searching at night you should leave your coat or a blanket that smells like you/your home/your dog at the place you were last together. If the dog retraces it’s steps at night and finds a familiar item they will often just lie down on top of it. If you make sure you are back at first light in the morning you might find them there waiting for you.


SACRAMENTO HAD SPY PLANE WATCHING PROTESTS

SACRAMENTO HAD SPY PLANE WATCHING PROTESTS

Report: Spy plane monitored protest where Guard head lives

SACRAMENTO HAD SPY PLANE WATCHING PROTESTS

SACRAMENTO,— A peaceful protest in a sleepy and affluent suburb that’s home to the head of the California National Guard was among four demonstrations monitored by National Guard spy planes earlier this year, according to a newspaper report Sunday.

A peaceful protest in a sleepy suburb that’s home to the head of the California National Guard was among four demonstrations monitored by National Guard spy planes. That’s according to a report by the Los Angeles Times. The four spy planes took to the skies over cities in June to monitor protests following the killing of George Floyd. Three watched demonstrations in Minneapolis, Phoenix, and Washington, D.C. But the target of the fourth was the Sacramento, Calif., suburb of El Dorado Hills. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

The four planes took to the skies over several cities in early June to monitor street protests following the killing of George Floyd, triggering concerns that the military was improperly gathering intelligence on U.S. citizens, the Los Angeles Times reported.

SACRAMENTO HAD SPY PLANE WATCHING PROTESTS

Three of the reconnaissance planes watched demonstrations in Minneapolis, Phoenix and Washington, D.C., that drew hundreds or thousands of protesters and were marred by violence.

But the target of the fourth plane was the prosperous Sacramento, California, suburb of El Dorado Hills, where much smaller rallies were entirely peaceful, the Times said.

NO EXPLANATION BY OFFICIALS

Local and state authorities have not explained in detail how and why that neighborhood was chosen for the mission when other California cities that had seen property destruction and street clashes amid large protests — including Los Angeles and Oakland — were not.


In this June 2, 2020, file photo, Arizona National Guardsmen disembark from military vehicles near the Arizona Capitol in Phoenix, where there have been several days of protests over the death of George Floyd, who died May 25 after being restrained by Minneapolis police. A peaceful protest in a sleepy suburb that’s home to the head of the California National Guard was among four demonstrations monitored by National Guard spy planes. That’s according to a report by the Los Angeles Times. The four planes took to the skies over cities in June to monitor protests following the killing of George Floyd. Three watched demonstrations in Minneapolis, Phoenix, and Washington, D.C. But the target of the fourth was the Sacramento, Calif., suburb of El Dorado Hills. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

THEY WERE OVER WHERE THE GAURD HEAD LIVES

The head of the California National Guard, Maj. Gen. David S. Baldwin, lives in El Dorado Hills, the Times learned. In addition to deploying the RC-26B reconnaissance plane, the Guard sent a Lakota helicopter to hover over the suburb, according to Guard officials and records. The aircraft were requested by the El Dorado County Sheriff’s Office, state records show.

Workers install security fencing and barriers at Lafayette Park near the White House in Washington. Protests continue over the death of George Floyd, a black man who was in police custody in Minneapolis. Three of the reconnaissance planes watched demonstrations in Minneapolis, Phoenix, and Washington, D.C., that drew hundreds of thousands of protesters and were marred by violence. But the target of the fourth spy plane was the prosperous Sacramento, Calif., suburb of El Dorado Hills, where much smaller rallies were entirely peaceful, the Times said. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

NEWSOME NOT AWARE

In response to questions from the Times, a spokesman for Gov. Gavin Newsom, who oversees the California National Guard, issued a statement late Saturday criticizing the operation.

“The use of the RC-26 to meet the sheriff’s request for aerial support to provide situational awareness for law enforcement is concerning and should not have happened,” Newsom spokesman Nathan Click said. “It was an operational decision made without the approval — let alone awareness — of the governor. After the incident, operational policies and protocols were reaffirmed and strengthened to ensure RC-26 aircraft are not used for these incidents again.”

Click did not elaborate or say whether the governor’s office is examining Baldwin’s role in the matter.

Baldwin told the Times he didn’t recall whether he had approved the mission. He said the fact that he lived in El Dorado Hills had “nothing to do with” the deployment of the RC-26B or the Lakota helicopter.

After questions from Congress members and others about the flights, an Air Force inspector general’s report issued in August concluded that the reconnaissance planes weren’t capable of capturing “distinguishing personal features of individuals” and did not violate rules barring the military from collecting intelligence on U.S. citizens. The inspector general’s report did not include a detailed examination of whether the mission to El Dorado Hills was warranted given the uneventful nature of the protests.

THE PENTAGON APPROVED

A Pentagon reports concludes that the use of National Guard reconnaissance planes in four U.S. cities to monitor the widespread protests earlier this year didn’t violate rules against the military collecting intelligence on Americans. The investigation by the Air Force inspector general found that the spy planes were used to gather information about crowd size, the crowd flows, and fires but they did not monitor individuals. Four spy planes took to the skies over cities in June 2020 to monitor protests following the killing of George Floyd. Three watched demonstrations in Minneapolis, Phoenix, and Washington, D.C. But the target of the fourth was the Sacramento, California, suburb of El Dorado Hills. Authorities have not explained how and why that neighborhood was chosen when other cities that had seen property destruction and street clashes were not. (Department of Defense via AP, File)

The report states that the mission grew out of a “high priority” request by the state Office of Emergency Services, made on behalf of the El Dorado sheriff’s office. According to the report, the sheriff’s office said it needed the aircraft to provide support for deputies on the ground who were tracking demonstrations.

Five current and former Guard officers with knowledge of the flights said in interviews that they knew of no justifiable reason for the El Dorado Hills mission.

“El Dorado Hills was the most monitored place in California,” said Dan Woodside, a recently retired Guard pilot who has flown the RC-26B. “Why was that? What was the threat?”

DAWG SAYS: SOME REAL SELF-SERVING ACTS AND PROFESSIONAL COURTESY ALL ON THE TAXPAYER DIME.