NEVADA ADVENTURES: MOUNT CHARLESTON WILDERNESS

This Hike To Nevada’s Oldest Living Tree Should Be On Every Nevadan’s Bucket List

This hike is by far one of the most memorable in the state of Nevada. Not only does it boast incredible views of the Toiyabe National Forest, but it actually leads you to the oldest living tree in the state! You’ll be in awe once you see what this ancient tree looks like it. This beautiful region definitely resembles a scene out of Alice In Wonderland. This is a hike that definitely belongs on your bucket list. Keep scrolling down for more information.

Located up in the gorgeous Spring Mountains in between Kyle Canyon and Lee Canyon is the trail that will lead you to Nevada’s oldest living tree, called Raintree. This is a popular trail because it boasts amazing scenery and it’s located just an hour outside of Vegas.


Despite the fact that it’s just a short drive from Las Vegas, this hike will make you feel like you’re millions of miles away from civilization. The hike to Raintree is just 2.7 miles, making it about 6 miles round trip. It will take a few hours to complete, but you’ll be so happy you did it.


Along the way you’ll see all sorts of oddities surrounding you. If you venture around for a little while you’re sure to come across Mummy Springs, a small waterfall that is often frozen over.


There’s even a weird structure made out of old tree branches that would make for the perfect little camp-out spot. You truly never know what you’re going to come across in the Nevada mountains.


As you get farther and farther up the mountain, the scenery begins to look kind of weird. The trees take on a warped quality. The landscape begins to look like something out of a fantasy novel.


At last, you’ll see it. You’ll be able to tell that it’s Raintree because there is a wooden sign parked in front of it. There’s something truly astonishing about seeing this beauty up close.


Raintree is an ancient bristlecone pine tree that is thought to be over 5,000 years old…and counting! It’s crazy to think about all of different eras this tree has lived through.


Definitely take your time exploring the area before heading back down. This is one of those places that reminds you why it’s so great to live in Nevada. Our state is always full of surprises.

Are you ready for this incredible hike? You’ll find the trailhead off of Highway 158 (Deer Creek Road) which is just past the Mt. Charleston Hotel. Here you’ll drive north for about 5 miles until you reach Hilltop Campground. Keep your eyes peeled for the parking lot on the left side of the road. This is where you’ll find the trailhead.


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NEW MEXICO CHILD WELFARE AGENCY ENCRYPTING MESSAGES ON APP THAT DELETES AND CANT BE RETREIVED


In the state department charged with child welfare, leadership and staff avoid a paper trail with encrypted messaging.

The leadership of the agency in charge of child welfare has directed staff to use encrypted messaging to communicate.

Since last year, the department tasked with overseeing foster care and child welfare in New Mexico has been encrypting and routinely deleting its communications, making much of its work essentially untraceable.

The leadership of the Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD) has directed staff to use Signal, a secure communication app, and has set chats to automatically delete. In contrast to standard text messages or emails — which could be accessed by attorneys, reporters and members of the public under the state’s open records laws — messages sent via Signal are all but impossible to retrieve. Once deleted, virtually no trace of a Signal conversation remains, even on the company’s server.

Attorneys and child advocates say the practice likely violates state open-records laws and could hamper any investigation into the department, which has been subject to lawsuits and massive criticism for its management of the foster-care system.

Records of employee communications have been central to journalists’ coverage of state agencies, including Searchlight New Mexico’s 2018 investigation of abuse within the foster care system.



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