RETRO TV SHOW: THE CASES OF EDDIE DRAKE (1952)

RETRO TV SHOW: THE CASES OF EDDIE DRAKE (1952)

This very short lived series ran originally on CBS and was picked up by DuMont before being cancelled after 13 episodes. Surprisingly well done and unlike most shows of the era was filmed and doesn’t just exist as kinescopes. Although some quality is lost by compression to YouTube this is taken from 16mm and should have more detail than most bargain basement versions floating around. Episode title is “Shoot The Works”. This was filmed in 1949 but not broadcast until 1952… Enjoy!


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A ZERO BAIL POLICY STORY

A ZERO BAIL POLICY STORY

 

Glendora Police Department

OCCURRED IN 2020

On Wednesday, April 29th, at about 8:28 a.m., our officers responded to a call of a male who was attempting to break into a vehicle in the 1400 block of South Grand Ave. When we arrived, we contacted Dijon Landrum, M/24, from Monterey Park, as he was attempting to drive away in a stolen vehicle. (The vehicle had been stolen out of East Los Angeles.) In addition to driving a stolen vehicle, he had stolen property and narcotics with him. Landrum was arrested. Due to the California Zero-Bail Policy, he was issued a citation and released.

Approximately one hour after Landrum was released, at about 2:20 p.m., we received a call of unknown male in the area of Bennett and Pennsylvania. This male was carrying a box, and was walking through front yards of residences. It appeared that the male was placing items in this box as he was walking through the properties. When we arrived, we contacted Dijon Landrum a second time, and it appeared he had property in his possession that did not belong to him. Due to the California Zero-Bail Policy, he was issued a citation, and the property was recovered by our officers.

Several hours later, at 8:49 p.m., we received a call of a vehicle that had just been stolen out of a parking lot in the 1300 block of South Grand Ave. Our officers were able to track the vehicle and found it westbound on the 10 freeway in the area of La Puente. With assistance from outside agencies (LA County Sheriffs and California Highway Patrol), they located the vehicle and a pursuit began. The pursuit ultimately ended in Pasadena, and Dijon Landrum was again arrested for being in possession of a stolen vehicle, and also for evading officers. Due to the California Zero-Bail Policy, Landrum was released with his third citation of the day.

SEE BAIL POLICY HERE:

We want to thank all of the citizens that helped with this investigation, particularly those that called when they noticed something suspicious. If anyone has any additional information regarding any of these investigations, or noticed any suspicious activity on home surveillance cameras during that time frame that may be related, please contact our dispatch at 626-914-8250.

*A quick note about LA County’s zero bail policy. First, this arrest occurred over 1 year ago during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic. At the time, there was a statewide zero bail policy that has since been rescinded.

However, California left the decision up to individual counties to pass their own similar zero bail policies. The Presiding Judge of Los Angeles County approved a somewhat less restrictive policy.

One of the provisions of the most recent policy (the third one passed since California rescinded the statewide one) is that anyone who has already been released under zero bail may be held in custody by the arresting police department then, if charges are filed, taken before who would then decide whether or not to release him.

This was changed specifically to prevent situations like this one. Check out the Los Angeles County Superior Court website to read the Third Zero Bail schedule.


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NEVADA ADVENTURES: A SINISTER MINING TOWN

The Old Mining Town In Nevada With A Sinister History That Will Terrify You

Many of Nevada’s liveliest towns started off as mining towns in the late 19th century. Although a handful of towns grew into the metropolises that they are today, a majority of mining towns did not have the same happy ending. Many towns, like the one featured here, simply perished. In this case, some of these old mining camps seemed destined for tragedy. This particular town is known today for its deadly history, which earned it the crude nickname “The Widowmaker”. You can explore the remains of this abandoned mining town today and experience its creepiness for yourself.

Nevada definitely has its fair share of ghost towns but this one, in particular, has a sad and disturbing history. The story of Delamar isn’t widely known, but it’s a tale that any ghost town or history enthusiast should know.


Delamar came into existence in 1889 when two prospectors, John Ferguson and Joseph Sharp, discovered gold around Monkeywrench Wash.

A mining camp was established and soon a newspaper publication and post office opened.


Delamar experienced its heyday from 1895 to 1900.

It was during this time that the town was the primary ore producer of Nevada.

The town boasted more than 3,000 residents by 1897! Things were certainly off to a good start.


However, it wouldn’t be long until it was apparent that ore production came at a price.

Delamar’s mine became notorious for the high number of deaths associated with it.

In fact, the high death rate earned the town its nickname of “The Widowmaker”.


Delamar’s mine was especially deadly because of the large amounts of silica dust created by ore production.

The dust would settle into the lungs of both miners and townspeople, causing a condition known as silicosis.


Silicosis was extremely deadly, especially in those days.

Legend has it that at one time, over 400 widows lived in Delamar. However, silicosis wasn’t the only tragedy this town suffered.



The entire town was almost completely destroyed by a fire that took place in 1900.

This event, coupled with the fact that production was slowing in the mine, led the mine owner to sell off his interest in the mines.


Delamar’s operation would come to a close in 1909. The site reopened briefly from 1929 to 1934, but few reminders of the once bustling town remain today. Today, you might see some partially crumbled structures and mining foundations, and the sight of wild horses roaming in the distance.


Did you know the sinister story behind “The Widowmaker”? This town certainly had a tragic history.



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