NOR CAL ADVENTURES- THE HISTORIC DIVE BAR OF YOUR DREAMS

NOR CAL ADVENTURES- THE HISTORIC DIVE BAR OF YOUR DREAMS

Opened In 1884, Heinold’s First And Last Chance Saloon In Northern California Is The Dive Bar Of Your Dreams

Whether you consider yourself a history buff or simply a well-versed drinker, a visit to one of California’s oldest saloons is a must. Heinold’s First and Last Chance Saloon has been serving drinks to thirsty patrons for well over a century…and it definitely looks like it. Located inside of an old shack in Jack London Square, the bar has seen all types of characters over the decades, from literary stars to your average Joe. Visiting this old-timey dive bar feels like stepping into a time capsule of California history, so be sure to check it out and experience it for yourself!

For a trip back in time, visit the dive bar in Oakland that’s been around the block a time or two. Heinold’s First and Last Chance Saloon has been around since 1884, making it a historical landmark that you can’t pass up.


 You’ll find Heinold’s located in Oakland’s Jack London Square, an apt location considering that Jack London was one of the saloon’s regulars!

They say it’s here that London wrote notes for what would eventually become his most famous novel, Call of the Wild.


 Originally built from the remains of a whaling vessel, the saloon definitely has an old-timey vibe that looks ripped straight from the Gold Rush era. From the slanted floors (made that way from the 1906 earthquake) to the myriad antiques lining the walls, this place looks like it hasn’t changed a bit over the last 140 years!


The saloon’s cozy, eclectic interior and the lovely outdoor patio make for a great spot to sit and relax with a cold drink in hand. You can even view the boats traveling up and down the estuary from the saloon, which makes you think of all the sailors that must’ve stopped into the saloon for one last drink before a long voyage.


 

In fact, it was the pub’s central location near the port that made it a popular spot for a first or last destination to drink alcohol for sailors. It wasn’t long before the saloon gained a nickname, “First and Last”, and it eventually stuck!


It’s amazing to think the saloon hasn’t lost its rustic charm over the many years it’s been in business. In fact, it’s still quirkier than ever! Today, the saloon is the last commercial establishment in the state with its original gas lighting, and it still only uses the original potbellied stove as a source of heat.


It’s clear that Heinold’s First and Last Chance Saloon is one of the most unique destinations to enjoy a drink in Northern California. Don’t put it off any longer and plan to enjoy a cocktail or beer at this historic saloon soon.

Have you been to this historic saloon in Oakland yet? If so, what were your thoughts? Feel free to share with us in the comments below!

Address: Jack London Square, 48 Webster St, Oakland, CA 94607, USA


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CALIFORNIA DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S TRYING TO STOP MASS RELEASES

 

CALIFORNIA DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S TRYING TO STOP MASS RELEASES

Photo by Suzy Hazelwood on Pexels.com

Prosecutors want to halt new good-time release credits for 76,000 California inmates

One week after California prison officials increased the amount of good-conduct credits that thousands of inmates could earn toward release, 41 district attorneys throughout the state have signed onto a petition asking the state to repeal the new rules.

Sacramento District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert and 40 other DAs sent a letter Thursday afternoon to California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Secretary Kathleen Allison objecting to the temporary emergency rules that went into effect last Friday.

The rules “have the effect of significantly shortening the length of sentence for 76,000 violent and serious offenders” and were adopted on an emergency basis despite the fact that the change was based on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s budget summary from May 2020, the prosecutors wrote.

“The regulations were passed under a claim of an emergency and first made public on Friday, April 30, 2021, at 3:00 p.m,” Schubert’s office said in a statement issued Thursday. “These regulations would result in the early release of some of California’s most violent criminals.”

Corrections spokeswoman Dana Simas said the department is “reviewing the petition at this time to determine next steps.”

“Proposition 57, which voters overwhelmingly approved in 2016, gave CDCR the authority to submit regulations to provide additional opportunities for incarcerated people to receive Good Conduct Credits, as allowed by statute,” she wrote in an email. “The emergency regulations are a result of that voter mandate.

 

ANTI GUN NEW YORK DOES NOT WANT TO PUNISH GUN CRIMES

ANTI GUN NEW YORK DOES NOT WANT TO PUNISH GUN CRIMES


As homicides, shootings explode in police-defunded NYC,

Manhattan DA candidates vow not to jail people for gun crimes

If ever there is a story that shows the absolute lunacy of Democratic politicians, this one needs to be near, if not at the top of the list. According to the Wall Street Journal, most of the current candidates running for Manhattan District Attorney are opposed to jailing people for illegal firearms possession.

Think about this for a moment. New York is currently in the middle of what can only be described as an epidemic crime wave, yet those running to be the chief law enforcement official in the city are taking progressive positions on gun crimes. The Journal reported it thusly:

“As New York City grapples with rising violent crime, the Manhattan district attorney candidates are responding with progressive law-enforcement proposals that underscore how different this election is for one of the nation’s top prosecutor jobs.

With few exceptions, they have floated proposals for a gun court to keep young defendants out of jail, partnerships with community-cased organizations and plans to funnel prosecutor resources to assist police in solving cases.”

Such policies would mark a departure from how Mr. Vance and his predecessor, Robert Morgenthau, prosecuted gun cases for four decades. For instance, suspects charged with felony possession of a loaded firearm face a mandatory minimum of 3.5 years in prison.

DAWG SAYS: IT APPEARS THAT THERE IS A STRONG MOVEMENT TO ONLY GO AFTER LAW ABIDING CITIZENS WITH GUNS- THE CRIMINALS CONTINUALLY GET A PASS.


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