Here’s the view from a NASA spacecraft bound for Jupiter asteroids

This image taken by Lucy’s L’LORRI camera captures 17th magnitude stars that are about 50,000 times fainter than the unaided human eye can see. The brightness of the image was adjusted to enhance visibility of faint stars. (Image credit: NASA/Goddard/SwRI/Johns Hopkins APL)


The journey out to Jupiter’s orbit is full of stars.

NASA’s Lucy spacecraft is early in its long trek to explore a group of asteroids called the Jupiter Trojans, which are small remnants of our early solar system that share the planet Jupiter’s orbit around the sun.

Lucy launched from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida atop a United Launch Alliance (ULA) Atlas V rocket on Oct. 16, 2021, and is preparing for an Earth flyby this fall before it begins its asteroid explorations. During the cruise, mission personnel are also completing tasks like instrument calibration, and new images taken during a February test of the spacecraft’s four visible-light cameras offer a detailed view of 11 different star fields.


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