THE KIPTOPEKE CONCRETE SHIPS CONTINUE PROTECT THE SHORELINE AND MORE THE US GOVERMNMENT SHOED INTEREST IN CONCRETE SHIPS THEN REVERSE ITSELF

The concept of concrete ships dates back to the 19th century, but the US government didn’t show interest in the concept until the First World War. During the conflict, President Woodrow Wilson ordered the construction of 24 vessels. Only 12 were delivered, and none of them entered into service.

Despite the ferry terminal closing down, the concrete ships that were scuttled in the Chesapeake Bay remain half-submerged in the water. Not only do they continue to protect the shoreline, they’ve also become home to numerous bird species and sea life.

During the warmer months, scores of ospreys, brown pelicans, seagulls and cormorants nest on the ships’ decks, which have since become covered in moss. Below the water’s surface, cracks in the concrete have created a superficial habitat for the likes of rockfish, flounder, oyster toads and bluefish.


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