UTAH OFFICER JEFF PAYNE: HAD HISTORY OF BAD BEHAVIOR

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Former dipshit of the day recipient on Dawgs Blog and Utah officer caught on video dragging a nurse from a hospital and handcuffing her was previously reprimanded for sexually harassing a female co-worker, according to police documents released amid investigations into the arrest that became a flashpoint in the debate over police use of force.

Internal affairs investigations by Salt Lake City police confirmed allegations that Detective Jeff Payne harassed a department employee in a “severe and persistent” way in 2013. It included several incidents of unwanted physical contact and a disparaging email, the records say.

Payne’s lawyer, Greg Skordas, said Monday that the reprimand is a problem, but it’s only part of Payne’s decorated 27-year record with the department.

Payne also faced a vehicle-chase complaint from the Utah Highway Patrol in 1995 that resulted in a two-week suspension without pay, according to the records. The documents didn’t detail the complaint but said he violated the police code of ethics on cooperation with other officers and courtesy toward other agencies.

The detective’s discipline history was released in response to a public-records request from The Associated Press and other media outlets as multiple investigations into the July 26 arrest of nurse Alex Wubbels play out.

Her lawyers are looking into Payne’s history and how the city has dealt with prior incidents, said attorney Karra Porter. Wubbels hasn’t sued the city, though Porter has said that could change.

Payne handcuffed the nurse after she refused to allow blood to be drawn from an unconscious patient, citing hospital policy. The detective had support from his supervisor, Lt. James Tracy, who said Wubbels could be arrested if she didn’t allow the blood draw.

An investigation by a civilian review board found Payne had apparently become frustrated after a long wait to perform the blood draw and ignored the nurse’s correct explanation that she could not allow it without a warrant or formal consent from the patient, who had been in a car crash.

Salt Lake City police apologized for the arrest, changed their blood-draw policies and placed Payne and Tracy on paid administrative leave after the video from police body cameras drew widespread attention online.

An internal investigation found evidence that the officers violated several policies. Police Chief Mike Brown is now weighing possible punishment that could include firing.

IS THIS GUY GONNA GET FUCKED OR WHAT?

MOTEL 6 INFORMING ICE OF DAILY GUEST LIST……..

MOTEL CHAIN IN DAMAGE CONTROL NOW


Court records obtained by the Phoenix New Times revealed ICE agents made at least 20 arrests at two Motel 6 locations in primarily Latino neighborhoods from February through August.

A front desk clerk at one of the Phoenix locations told the New Times, “We send a report every morning to ICE — all the names of everybody that comes in. Every morning at about 5 o’clock, we do the audit and we push a button and it sends it to ICE.”

While a 2015 Supreme Court Decision bars city from obtaining hotel guest lists without a warrant, it’s not a problem if employees volunteer the information.

Motel 6 confirmed the reports on Thursday with a statement that read, “This was undertaken at the local level without the knowledge of senior management. When we became aware of it, it was discontinued.”

“Moving forward, to help ensure that this does not occur again, we will be issuing a directive to every one of our more than 1,400 locations nationwide, making clear that they are prohibited from voluntarily providing daily guest lists to ICE,” Motel 6 said in a second statement issued through spokesperson Jillian Perera on Thursday.

SET ASIDE THE IMIGRATION ISSUE FOR ONE MINUET, AND TALK ABOUT PRIVACY ISSUES. I GUESS THEY WANT BIG BROTHER WATCHING EVERYONE. AND DO THEY WANT TO BE KNOWN AS ACTIVE AGENTS FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT?

CAN ANYONE SAY DAMAGE CONTROL? WE WILL LEAVE THE LIGHT ON FOR YOU……..

ORWELL WOULD BE PROUD…….

MODESTO BEE CLICK BAIT STORY’S

ARE BECOMING EMBARASSING

By Marty Carlson

9-14-2017


Recently a click bait headline was put out by the Modesto bee, saying “if you commit a crime there’s a good chance you’re on camera”

the article goes on to say that there placing cameras in certain neighborhoods is a crime-fighting aid the police department.

They say will be an integral part of the departments real-time crime center – where officers can access live feeds of six cameras and they can also access other existing cameras throughout the city.

The police department is also partnered with Ontel and rank security companies to gain access to their camera feeds.

It gives me peace of mind to know that if I do not commit a crime, based on this headline, I will not be on camera.

Just a typical headline from the now struggling Modesto bee to try to influence people to click on their articles that have become extremely pathetic of late.

It’s not responsible journalism in the same way they sell massive advertising to malware infested websites. Be sure to use ad blockers and keep antivirus updated when using the Modesto bee.

 

DIPSHIDIOT OF THE DAY: SEATTLE MAYOR (WAS) ED MURRAY…….

RESIGNS AFTER ANOTHER ALLEGATION OF SEX ABUSE COMES TO LIGHT

9-14-2017


Seattle Mayor Ed Murray announced his resignation Tuesday, hours after new sexual abuse allegations surfaced against the embattled politician. Murray, a Democrat and the city’s first openly gay mayor, said he was resigning effective 5 p.m. Wednesday so the scandal would no longer overshadow his office.

The mayor’s announcement comes after his cousin gave an interview with the Seattle Times alleging abuse, the latest in a series of similar accusations. The cousin is the fifth person to publicly accuse Murray of child sexual abuse since a lawsuit was filed against him in April.

Murray denied the allegations, as he has in the past. Previously, he called them part of a political effort to stymy his progressive agenda and support for LGBTQ and immigrant rights.”While the allegations against me are not true, it is important that my personal issues do not affect the ability of our city government to conduct the public’s business,” he said in a statement. “To the people of this special city and to my dedicated staff, I am sorry for this painful situation.”

Council President Bruce Harrell will become mayor upon Murray’s resignation. Harrell has five days to decide to hold the position for the remainder of Murray’s term, which ends in December.Murray, 62, was elected in 2014 after 18 years as a state lawmaker. In his statement Tuesday, he touted his accomplishments from his political career. As an openly gay state legislator, he sponsored Washington state’s historic marriage equality law and a landmark bill banning discrimination based on sexual orientation.

As mayor, he raised the minimum wage to $15 an hour, passed ambitious affordable housing legislation, and laid the groundwork for a city-owned sports and entertainment arena. He was a party to a lawsuit filed in March on behalf of the city against the Trump administration over its executive order on so-called sanctuary cities.But, in light of the latest allegations, he said it was clear it is best for the city for him to step aside.

He withdrew from the Seattle mayor’s race in May, after a lawsuit accused him of repeatedly raping a man about 30 years ago. Murray denied the allegations, saying he never heard his accuser’s name before the lawsuit. But he said he was dropping his re-election bid so the scandal would not overtake the election.

Delvonn Heckard said he was 15 and Murray was 32 when the sexual acts occurred, claiming that Murray paid him for them.

The complaint further alleged that Heckard was not the only child abused by the mayor. On at least one occasion, Heckard said he was at Murray’s apartment when another boy who appeared underage was there. “D.H. was of the understanding that Mr. Murray was having sex with the other boy for money at the same time,” the complaint alleged. A spokesman for the mayor said the allegations were unfounded.

Heckard withdrew the lawsuit in June to complete counseling, according to his lawyer. In a news conference following the withdrawal, Murray said the lawsuit was politically motivated. He vowed to continue his “progressive agenda.”

EQUIFAX HACK INFORMATION…….

EQUIFAX HACK WARNING


By Tom Jensen

9-8-2017


As most of you probably already know, Equifax has been hacked, and over 280 million people have lost all their information. Equifax discovered the breach on July 29 but did not disclose the problem until Sept. 7, a possible violation of law.

This will allow criminals to do virtually anything they want fraudulently in your name. It could cost you everything that you own. Equifax is offering a free credit monitoring system, but it comes with a price. If you sign up for their free credit monitoring, you waive your right to be part of a class action lawsuit, and must submit to arbitration.

I suggest that everyone affected should purchase their own protection, and preserve their right to sue Equifax. I for one signed up with Lifelock.

thPOYU3BCZ

The Lifelock standard plan will cost me a total of $197.80 per year, and that covers my wife as well. An individual standard plan will cost $98.90 per year. Call Lifelock at 800-416-0599 or go to lifelock.com to sign up.

I believe that Equifax will be paying those of us that have lost our information a large amount of money when the dust settles.

Tom Jensen

DAWG SAYS:

I HAVE HAD LIFELOCK FOR SEVERAL YEARS AND THEY HAVE BEEN VERY HELPFUL IN A COUPLE OF SITUATIONS.

This is not a paid advertisement just recent events need all of us to protect ourselves.

UTAH HOSPITAL TO POLICE: STAY AWAY FROM OUR NURSES!

WELL DONE EX-OFFICER PAYNE YOU DUMASS!

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The University of Utah Hospital, where a nurse was manhandled and arrested by police as she protected the legal rights of a patient, has imposed new restrictions on law enforcement, including barring officers from patient-care areas and from direct contact with nurses.

Gordon Crabtree, interim chief executive of the hospital, said at a Monday news conference that he was “deeply troubled” by the arrest and manhandling of burn unit nurse Alex Wubbels on July 26. In accord with hospital policy and the law, she had refused to allow a Salt Lake City police officer to take a blood sample from an unconscious patient. Wubbels obtained a copy of the body cam video of the confrontation and, after consulting her lawyer, the hospital and police officials, released it last week.

“This will not happen again,” Crabtree said, praising Wubbels for “putting her own safety at risk” to “protect the rights of patients.”

Margaret Pearce, chief nursing officer for the University of Utah hospital system, said she was “appalled” by the officer’s actions and has already implemented changes in hospital protocol to avoid any repetition.

She said police will no longer be permitted in patient-care areas, such as the burn unit where Wubbels was the charge nurse on the day of the incident and from emergency rooms.

In addition, officers will have to deal with “house supervisors” instead of nurses when they have a request.

ADVOCATES CLAIM CALIFORNIA TOO LIENIENT IN HANDLING DISCIPLINE AGAINST JUDGES…….

IS THERE ACCOUNTIBILITY?


From SF Gate

California’s judicial disciplinary agency is too lenient and too secretive, an advocacy group charged Monday in a report submitted to the Legislature.

The Commission on Judicial Performance, established in 1960 as the first agency in any state with the power to investigate judges for ethical violations, dismisses nearly 90 percent of the public complaints it receives and imposes discipline much less often than similar agencies in Arizona, Texas and New York, the report said. It was issued by Court Reform LLC, a nonprofit headed by Joseph Sweeney, an East Bay mathematician who said he was partly motivated by his encounters with family law courts.

“California has fallen behind its peers in judicial accountability” and “fails to protect the public from judicial misconduct,” Sweeney’s group told a state Assembly subcommittee that oversees the commission’s $4.3 million budget.

The report did not identify any abusive or unethical judges who were allowed to stay on the bench. But the advocacy group said the commission’s proceedings are virtually impossible to monitor because most of them — complaints against judges, the judges’ responses and the commission’s decisions to dismiss complaints — are sealed from the public.

The commission releases a summary of the complaint and the judge’s reply only in the small fraction of cases that result in public disciplinary action, for the most serious misconduct.

In other disciplinary cases, when the commission finds the misbehavior to be relatively minor, it withholds the documents and issues a private reprimand.

The report called for an end to private disciplinary actions and for a state audit of the commission.

The commission — three judges, two lawyers and six public members — has the power to publicly reprimand a judge, issue a censure for more severe misconduct or remove a judge from office, an order that the judge can appeal to the state Supreme Court.

During the past decade, the report said, the commission has received an average of 1,082 complaints against judges each year, but has taken public disciplinary action against only 67 judges in that 10-year period, with 34 judges leaving office after disciplinary complaints.

Based on the number of complaints received in other states, the report said, New York’s agency was more than twice as likely to impose public discipline as the California commission, Texas’ agency was nearly three times as likely, and Arizona’s was four times as likely.

In response, Victoria Henley, the commission’s director and chief counsel, said the report’s statistics were “extremely flawed.” For example, she said, Sweeney’s group counted informal advisories and warnings to judges as disciplinary actions in Arizona but not in California.

She said one likely reason New York and Texas discipline judges at a higher rate than California is that all judges in California are lawyers, but 40 percent of the judges in New York, and as many as 50 percent in Texas, are non-lawyers.

Henley also said private reprimands of judges serve important purposes — educating the judge, deterring future misconduct and justifying increased punishment for further violations.

But Sweeney said California voters, who decide whether to elect or retain the 2,200 members of the nation’s largest judicial system, are entitled to learn about accusations of wrongdoing and how they are handled.

“The public needs as much information as possible about potential misconduct,” Sweeney said.