GAVIN NEWSOME WANTS EXEMPTION FROM HIS OWN LAW

Hearing 7/9/21 On Gov. Newsom Lawsuit Against SOS to Get Party ID on Recall Ballot

Newsom blew the deadline on a statute he signed into law in 2019

As the Globe reported last week, Governor Gavin Newsom filed a lawsuit against California Secretary of State Shirley Weber Monday asking the court to require the Secretary of State print Newsom’s political party on the recall ballots, after neglecting to file the proper party notice 16 months ago.

“Lawmakers who are the subject of a recall have the option to file a notice of party preference after the recall notice is first submitted, which for Newsom would have been 16 months ago in February 2020,” the Globe reported. “However, he didn’t file a notice with the Secretary of State’s office until June 19, 2021, well over a year past the deadline. Newsom’s team asked for the party to be listed on the ballot due to it being a ‘good faith mistake,’ but Secretary Weber stuck with the law.”

Before Senate Bill 151 passed and was signed by Newsom in 2019, politicians targeted in recalls were not allowed to have their party next to their names.

Newsom missed the deadline for requiring the Secretary of State to do so by 16 months.


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STARTING TODAY CALIFORNIA TO RELEASE MASSIVE AMOUNT OF INMATES

STARTING TODAY CALIFORNIA TO RELEASE MASSIVE AMOUNT OF INMATES


76K California violent, career felons get earlier releases

 

California is increasing early release credits for 76,000 inmates starting today, including violent and repeat felons.

With little notice, California is increasing early release credits for 76,000 inmates starting Saturday. They include violent and repeat felons.

The move comes as the state further trims the population of what once was the nation’s largest state correctional system.

More than 63,000 inmates convicted of violent crimes will be eligible for good behavior credits that shorten their sentences by one-third instead of the one-fifth that had been in place since 2017.

About 13,000 inmates convicted of serious but nonviolent offenses will be eligible for release after serving half their sentences.

DAWG SAYS: GEE WHAT COULD GO WRONG?

I AM GLAD I HAVE LEFT THAT STATE ESPECIALLY WHEN THEY DEFUND THE POLICE AND YOU CANNOT DEFEND YOURSELF IN ANTI GUN CALIFORNIA.


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MALE CALIFORNIA INMATES REQUESTING MOVES TO WOMENS PRISONS

MALE CALIFORNIA INMATES REQUESTING MOVES TO WOMENS PRISONS


261 California Prison Inmates Have Requested Transfer to Women’s Prisons Since January

Since January, 261 California prison inmates have requested transfers to prisons aligning with their gender identity, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation told the Daily Caller News Foundation Tuesday.

Democratic California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed S.B. 132 into law in January, a bill that requires the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) to ask every individual entering the department’s custody to specify their pronouns, their gender identity, and whether they identify as transgender, nonbinary, or intersex.

The law prevents CDCR from disciplining the individual if that individual refuses to give this information, allows for the information to be updated later on, and requires staff to use the gender pronouns that the individual requested.

It also requires that CDCR house the individual in a “correctional facility designated for men or women based on the individual’s preference.” Similar legislation has been passed in Connecticut and Massachusetts.

Since the bill went into effect in January, 261 inmates have requested “gender-based housing” transfers, the CDCR told the DCNF Tuesday. The vast majority of these requests were from inmates requesting to be transferred to female facilities, and only six inmates did not request to be in a women’s facility.

“255 are from transgender women and non-binary incarcerated people who are requesting to be housed in a female institution and six are from transgender men and non-binary incarcerated people who are requesting to be housed in a male institution,” Deputy Press Secretary Terry Thornton told the DCNF.

CDCR has not denied a single gender-based housing request, the spokesman confirmed.

The CDCR has approved 21 of the requests, and four of these 21 have been transferred to Central California Women’s Facility in Chowchilla.

“Two of the 21 have changed their minds,” Thornton said. The spokesman said that as of April 2, 1,129 incarcerated people self-identify as transgender, non-binary, and intersex.

Prison inmates at Chowchilla told the Los Angeles Times that “men are coming” and that the prisoners should anticipate sexual violence.

“That if we think it’s bad now, be prepared for the worst. That it’s going to be off the hook, it’s going to be jumping,” 41-year-old Tomiekia Johnson told the publication that staffers said. “They say we’re going to need a facility that’s going to be like a maternity ward. They say we’re going to have an inmate program where inmates become nannies.”

Prisoners fear that inmates requesting transfers are lying about their gender identity in order to be transferred to women’s prisons, the LA Times reported. This has slowed down the transfer process, according to the publication.

Thornton told the LA Times that meetings and discussions “have helped to dispel any fears” and that “a person’s gender identity is self-reported and CDCR will evaluate any request submitted by an incarcerated person for gender-based housing.”

The prison system requested several million dollars from California for implementing the law, Thornton said.


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DURING PANDEMIC CALIFORNIA BUDGET FLOURISHES

DURING PANDEMIC CALIFORNIA BUDGET FLOURISHES


California revenues soar as rich get richer during pandemic

At the end of 2020, California had lost a record 1.6 million jobs during the pandemic. Nearly a half-million people stopped even trying to look for work. Business properties saw their value plummet more than 30%.

But California’s bank account is overflowing. As of January, the state’s tax collections were $10.5 billion ahead of projections. By the end of the fiscal year on July 1, Gov. Gavin Newsom and the state Legislature could have a $19 billion surplus to spend.

It’s so much money that, for just the second time ever, the state is projected to trigger a state law requiring the government to send refunds to taxpayers.

Economic downturns usually put state governments in a bind, forcing them to cut services at a time when people need them most. That’s what happened a decade ago during the Great Recession when the housing market collapsed and the stock market tanked, creating a cascade of losses from the wealthy on down.

But this time, with the pandemic forcing the closure of bars, restaurants, theme parks, sporting events and small businesses, lower-wage workers bore the brunt of the losses while the wealthier worked from home. The economic losses started at the bottom of the income ladder and so far they haven’t made their way up to the top.


CALIFORNIA CHURCH FIGHTING NEWSOM IN COURT

CALIFORNIA CHURCH FIGHTING NEWSOM IN COURT

A California church continues its legal fight against what it calls unconstitutional orders.

The case involving Harvest Rock Church and Harvest Rock International Ministry is currently at the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals after a district judge ruled against an emergency injunction.

CALIFORNIA CHURCH FIGHTING NEWSOM IN COURT

Liberty Counsel, which is representing the ministry, appealed to the Ninth Circuit after Judge Jesus Bernal ruled against the injunction that sought to allow the church to remain open while Harvest Rock fights Gov. Gavin Newsom and his lockdown orders.

Liberty Counsel attorney Mat Stav says there is “zero worship” going on at Harvest Church, located in Pasadena, as well as 162 other satellite church congregations located across the state.

“I’m talking about no one can gather together for worship,” Staver explains. “And that even includes Bible studies and home fellowship in their life groups, (so) you can’t even have somebody in your home that doesn’t live there.”

Violators face a criminal charge punishable by up to a year in prison.

Staver tells OneNewsNow the pastor has received a warning letter from a prosecutor threatening criminal charges that would apply to the pastor, church staff, and anyone who attends a service.

Californians are witnessing the state and local governments threaten church worship at the same time their liberal governor has praised – and defended – the tens of thousands who have marched in the streets in recent months to demand racial justice and police reform.

“The virus doesn’t discriminate between religious and non-religious gatherings,” Staver says, “but Gov. Newsom clearly does and that’s a problem with the First Amendment.”


CALIFORNIA PREPARING SLAVE REPARATIONS

CALIFORNIA PREPARING SLAVE REPARATIONS

CALIFORNIA PREPARING SLAVE REPARATIONS

Bill AB 3121 — the first of its kind in any state — was signed on Wednesday. It creates a nine-member task force that will inform Californians about slavery and explore ways the state might provide reparations, Newsom’s office said in a news release.

The task force will convene in the wake of nationwide protests calling for racial justice and police reform following the death of George Floyd while in police custody in May. Democratic lawmakers in Congress have also called for a vote on a bill to study reparations.

“As a nation, we can only truly thrive when every one of us has the opportunity to thrive. Our painful history of slavery has evolved into structural racism and bias built into and permeating throughout our democratic and economic institutions,” said Newsom in the release.

Newsom acknowledged that Black Californian’s and people of color in the state still face “discrimination and disadvantages.”

DAWG SAYS: YOUR MASSIVE TAX DOLLARS AT WORK.


WHERE IS THE ELECTRICITY FOR ELECTRIC CARS

WHERE IS THE ELECTRICITY FOR ELECTRIC CARS


WHERE IS THE ELECTRICITY FOR ELECTRIC CARS

It’s a long drive to just about anywhere Gary Wright needs to go. A rancher in the far northeastern corner of California, he sometimes has to drive nearly 100 miles, one-way, to get to where his cattle graze. It’s 36 miles to Klamath Falls, Ore., for a significant errand run.

There are only a few gas stations along the routes through the forests and high deserts in Modoc County — let alone electric vehicle charging stations. There are none near the rangeland where Wright’s cattle graze.

So he was baffled when Gov. Gavin Newsom announced last week that California would require all new passenger cars and trucks to be electric or “zero-emission” by 2035 to combat climate change.

Newsom’s directive signaled the governor was moving more aggressively on climate change during one of the hottest years in California, and with wildfires consuming nearly 4 million acres — the most in modern history. But his order comes with significant challenges for rural California and the Central Valley, where many people drive all day for work, not just to commute, and traveling long distances is a necessity.

Electric vehicle companies say battery technology is improving, but as it stands, the best electric car batteries currently on the market have a range of no more than 250 miles. There are few options for electric pickups like the ones Wright would need to haul equipment and livestock trailers over long distances.

DAWG SAYS: CALIFORNIA CANNOT KEEP THE LIGHTS ON IN THEIR STATE, HOW ARE THEY GOING TO KEEP THESE CARS CHARGED?

GAS POWERED GENERATORS I GUESS.


CALIFORNIA INMATES HOUSED BY GENDER IDENTITY

CALIFORNIA INMATES HOUSED BY GENDER IDENTITY

Newsom signs law allowing transgender inmates to be placed in prison by their gender identity

CALIFORNIA INMATES HOUSED BY GENDER IDENTITY


The California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) will now house inmates based on their gender identity rather than their sex assigned at birth – but only if the state does not have “management or security concerns” with individual inmates.

The law Newsom signed Saturday requires officers to ask inmates privately during the intake process if they identify as transgender, nonbinary or intersex, then inmates can request to be placed in a facility that houses either men or women.

The CDCR cannot deny requests solely because of inmates’ anatomy or sexual orientation. When a request is denied, the state must provide a written statement to the inmate explaining the decision and give them an opportunity to object.

“California has some of the strongest pro LGBTQ+ laws in the nation and with the bills signed today, our march toward equality takes an additional step forward,” Newsom said in a statement.

“These new laws will help us better understand the impacts of COVID-19 on the LGBTQ+ community, establish a new fund to support our transgender sisters and brothers and advance inclusive and culturally competent efforts that uphold the dignity of all Californians, regardless of who you are or who you love.”

Similar laws protecting transgender inmates exist in Rhode Island, New York City and Massachusetts.


CALIFORNIA BANS GAS CARS BY 2035

CALIFORNIA BANS GAS CARS BY 2035

CALIFORNIA BANS GAS CARS BY 2035

Emphasizing that California must stay at the forefront of the fight against climate change, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Wednesday issued an executive order to restrict new car sales in the state to only zero-emission vehicles by 2035 and threw his support behind a ban on the controversial use of hydraulic fracturing by oil companies.

Under Newsom’s order, the California Air Resources Board would implement the phase-out of new gas-powered cars and light trucks and also require medium and heavy-duty trucks to be zero-emission by 2045 where possible.

California would be the first state in the nation to mandate 100% zero-emission vehicles, though 15 countries already have committed to phasing out gas-powered cars.

Newsom did not take executive action to ban the controversial oil extraction method known as fracking but called on the state Legislature to do so, setting up what could be a contentious political fight when lawmakers reconvene in Sacramento next year.

Taken together, the two climate change efforts would accelerate the state’s already aggressive efforts to curtail carbon emissions and petroleum hazards and promise to exacerbate tensions with a Trump administration intent on bridling California’s liberal environmental agenda.

DAWG SAYS: THE DEMOCRATS KEEP SAYING THEY DEFEND THE LOWINCOME PEOPLE,

BUT SOMETHING LIKE THIS PUTS LOW INCOME WALKING EVERYWHERE AS THEY CANNOT AFFORD THIS.


 

CALIFORNIA JUVENILE PRISONS SUSPEND INTAKES

CALIFORNIA JUVENILE PRISONS SUSPEND INTAKES

The coronavirus is spiking in California’s youth prisons. Intakes suspended in Ventura, Stockton


CALIFORNIA JUVENILE PRISONS SUSPEND INTAKES

A coronavirus outbreak at a youth correctional facility in Ventura County had climbed to 47 cases by Thursday.

Ventura County Public Health officials said 39 youths and eight employees have now tested positive for the virus that causes COVID-19.

The first case at the Ventura Youth Correctional Facility near Camarillo was reported July 17.

A week later, 21 youths and 1 employee had tested positive. Now, that number has more than doubled.

Intakes suspended locally

Along with the Ventura County facility, the agency has a youth correctional complex in Stockton and a forestry camp in Northern California. In all, they hold around 700 to 800 juveniles and young adults.

As of Friday, the agency said 64 youths have tested positive within a DJJ facility. The first case was identified June 14.

DAWG SAYS: INTAKES HAVE STOPPED BUT NO RELEASES YET-ONLY ADULT CAREER CRIMINALS HAVE BEEN RELEASED.


CALIFORNIA NOT EXPLAINING RELEASES (VIDEO)

CALIFORNIA NOT EXPLAINING RELEASES

Won’t Say Why OR How Many Violent Criminals Are Walking Free From Potential Life Sentences

CALIFORNIA NOT EXPLAINING RELEASES OF VIOLENT OFFENDERS

For weeks, CBS13 has been pressing the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation for transparency on the early inmate releases.

Now the office says because of privacy laws, they will not tell the public why a woman serving a life prison sentence for murder is free.

Nor will they even where she is.

“It’s really a slap in the face to my brother, to the judicial system,” said Dena Love.

Love is once again having to relive the murder of her brother,

Kevin “John” Ruska Jr., who was kidnapped and eventually died at the hands of Terebea Williams in 1998.

Williams only served a quarter of her 84 years to life sentence for first-degree murder.

Kevin “John” Ruska was killed by Williams and the family says they still don’t know why.

“She should have spent the rest of her life behind bars,” said Love.

Williams is now walking free after she was deemed at high medical risk for the virus. The Yolo County District Attorneys Office was told she suffers a heart condition.




 

CALIFORNIA: TRUMPS NUMBERS LOW

CALIFORNIA: TRUMPS NUMBERS LOW

BIDEN LEADING TRUMP BY LARGE MARGIN IN CALIFORNIA

CALIFORNIA: TRUMPS NUMBERS LOW

President Donald Trump was never going to carry deep blue California in the November presidential election.

But his level of support in the Golden State is shrinking dramatically amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic,

Black Lives Matter protests and the struggling economy.

According to a new poll from the Institute of Governmental Studies (IGS) at UC Berkeley,

Just 28% of likely voters favor Trump while 67% back Biden, giving the former vice president an impressive 39-point lead

Ahead even of the record-breaking 30% margin by which Hillary Clinton won the state four years ago. We all know what happened next.

This time, Biden is the preferred candidate among white, Latino, Asian American and Black voters in California,

And across every region of the state, every age group and all education levels.

“In many states, white voters are closely divided and there are big differences in the views of President Trump across racial groups,”

IGS co-director Eric Schickler said in a statement. “Not so in California.”

Support for Trump does remain strong among Republican voters and those who identify as very conservative

With 88% and 84%, respectively, saying they would support the president’s reelection.

Just 26% of the state’s likely voters are registered Republicans, however, and support for the president is eroding.



 

MORE CALIFORNIA SOCIALIST ACTIVITIES

MORE CALIFORNIA SOCIALIST ACTIVITIES

You still have to get your kids vaccinated even if their California school goes online

MORE CALIFORNIA SOCIALIST ACTIVITIES

Most California kids will kick off the 2020-2021 academic year with distance learning due to the coronavirus,

But the state’s strict vaccination laws still require students be up-to-date on their shots before starting class.

The California Legislature in recent years has passed some of the tightest vaccine mandates in the country,

To increase the immunization rates in schools.

In 2015, lawmakers approved Senate Bill 277 to exclude personal beliefs from the list of reasons parents can skip vaccinating their children.

Last year, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed follow-up measure Senate Bill 276 ,

To increase oversight of doctors who issue five or more medical exemptions in a single year ,

After clusters of unvaccinated children in certain schools were tied to a handful of physicians.

Before students are granted admission, schools are required to review incoming childcare,

Transitional kindergarten, kindergarten and 7th grade vaccine records.

Despite the pandemic forcing California kids behind a screen at home for at least the start of the year,

State Sen. Richard Pan, the Sacramento Democrat who wrote both vaccine laws, said the regulations still stand.

The Department of Public Health also confirmed that immunization requirements for school haven’t changed.

“In order to enroll in school, the law is pretty clear,” Pan said. “Otherwise you’re not enrolled, and that’s that.”

Even online or home schooling.

OPINION FROM LA TIMES

OPINION FROM LA TIMES

Op-Ed: Is the California dream finished?

OPINION FROM LA TIMES

For all the persistent rhetoric from California’s leaders about this state being on the cutting edge of social and racial justice,

The reality on the ground is far grimmer.

Our new report on the state of California’s middle class shows a lurch toward a society in which power and money are increasingly concentrated.

And where upward mobility is constrained, amid shocking levels of poverty.

Most of this data doesn’t even account for the recent effect of the coronavirus outbreak,

Which has pushed the state’s unemployment rate to 15.5%, higher than the nationwide rate of 14.7%.

Even before the pandemic, California topped the nation in the widest gap between middle and upper-middle income earners,

And has become progressively more unequal in recent years.

But its greatest shame is the prevalence of poverty amid enormous affluence.

California’s poverty rate, adjusted for cost of living, is the highest of any state and was higher in 2019 than in 2007.

California’s political leaders like to talk about racial justice, but Latino and Black populations bear the brunt of the pain.

And by some measures, such as minority home ownership,

California remains far behind states such as Texas, Michigan, Arizona and Florida.

OPINION FROM LA TIMES ON CALIFORNIA

Gov. Gavin Newsom and state lawmakers should stop trying to sell the myth of the California dream.

On its current trajectory, this state is socially, fiscally and economically unsustainable.

The biggest drivers of California’s poverty and staggering inequality are low-wage jobs and extraordinarily high housing costs.

But it’s not too late to change course if state policies that help create these twin crises are rolled back.

That means reforming business regulations and eliminating regulatory regimes that suppress development in the most populous counties.

Instead of encouraging high density growth along the ultra-pricey coastal areas,

We need an intensive, state-driven push for job development and housing creation in less costly peripheral regions.

Since 2008, the state has created five times as many low-wage jobs as high-wage jobs,

This is according to an analysis of Bureau of Labor Statistics numbers.

The vast majority of jobs produced pay less than the median wage, and 40% pay under $40,000 a year.

 No metro area in California ranks in the top 10 in the U.S. for well-paying jobs for people without a college degree,

but in 2019 four — Ventura, Los Angeles, San Jose and San Diego

OPINION FROM LA TIMES ON CALIFORNIA

Were among the 10 worst in the country for non-college educated people looking for better paying jobs.

State policies — particularly environmental regulations that have led to high energy prices and long approval processes to get development permits,

Have been key factors to constricting the creation of higher-paying jobs.

California’s energy prices, now among the highest in the nation,

Hit not only the pocketbooks of working and middle-class Californians but have discouraged more jobs in manufacturing.

And on July 1, the state gasoline tax rose again by 6%.

The state is also falling behind in creating business and professional service jobs, the largest high-wage sector.

Overall, California lost 1.6 million above-average-paying jobs in the past decade, more than twice as many as any other state.

This pattern could become worse if tech workers are given the option to work remotely after the pandemic ends.

In fact, as many as two out of three Bay Area tech workers say they would leave that area if they could.

OPINION FROM LA TIMES ON CALIFORNIA

This lack of good jobs converges with unaffordable housing to destroy hope for a better future for millions of Californians.

To qualify for a mortgage on a median-priced house  in the San Jose metropolitan area requires an annual income of about $250,000.

In Orange County, $167,000 is required, and in Los Angeles County $125,000.

Newsom has called for building 3.5 million new homes by 2025. 

Yet, according to our analysis of Census data, housing construction continues to lag (burdened by lengthy permit processes and often years of litigation)

With 110,000 housing units built in 2019 — far below the 302,934 units built in 1986 when California had one-third fewer residents.

At the current rate, it would require nearly 30 years to build 3.5 million homes.

Persistent housing shortages mean that most new single-family and apartment construction tends to be for the high-end market.

Only 7,800 of the new apartments built between 2015 and 2017 in Los Angeles — around 11% of total construction — are affordable,

With rents of around $1,842 a month.

By contrast, average rent on the 66,000 “market rate” apartments exceeds $2,500 a month.

With the Bay Area and coastal Los Angeles too expensive for most middle- and working-class families,

they have headed to places with more affordable housing but relatively few high-paying jobs.

The Inland Empire of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, for example, also suffers the lowest average pay of any of the nation’s 50 largest counties.

The COVID-19 pandemic offers California a way out of this dilemma,

If it can adjust to an already accelerating national movement away from dense cities and, even among millennials, toward suburbs.

Employees working from home, notes demographer Wendell Cox, have already passed the number of those using transit in Southern California

Before the pandemic and have now grown markedly everywhere. This would represent an environmental win:

It would allow commuters to work closer to home, thus reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

The many benefits of working remotely — or in dispersed business centers — are apparent,

OPINION FROM LA TIMES ON CALIFORNIA

In terms of giving affordable new choices to California families and companies.

This would mean rethinking state policies,

That have made reducing auto use a top priority and greenlighting projects in less expensive regions,

Rather than force development into areas where prices are highest and opposition to new development is often most intense.

There’s certainly room to grow, contrary to conventional wisdom.

Urbanization covered only 5.3% of the state in 2010, according to the Census Bureau data.

Rather than try to cram growth into a few areas, it would make sense to find ways to offer incentives to a new Tesla plant to Fresno or to Riverside County,

Or have Google put a customer support operation in Manteca rather than Mississippi, as it announced recently.

But unlike in other states, there is no coordinated strategy in California to help industry grow middle-class employment.

The biggest impediments are not physical or even fiscal,

But the willingness of state leaders to acknowledge the crisis for working people of all ages in California,

Made worse by the fallout from the pandemic.

The question is, do they care enough about economic and racial justice to build a vision and adopt policies that would give more people a shot at a decent job and affordable housing?

DAWG SAYS: AS FAR AS JOBS GO; CALIFORNIA HAS MANY RESOURCES IN ITS FAVOR- EXCEPT POLITICS.

YOU CANNOT TAX PEOPLE INTO PROSPERITY, SOME FEEL MONEY IS THE ONLY ANSWER, BUT IT IS NOT.

TAXES CHASE GOOD JOBS AWAY TO AREAS WHO REALIZE LESS RESTRICTIONS AND TAXES MEAN MORE JOBS,

ARIZONA-TEXAS-NEVADA. GOOD JOBS THAT NEED PEOPLE WILL DRIVE WAGES UP.

MORE FAST FOOD OUTLETS WILL NOT FIT THAT NEED.

ALSO, ALL THE REQUIREMENTS FOR BUILDING PERMITS, INSPECTIONS, ENVIROMENTAL IMPACT REPORTS,

DRIVES THE COST OF HOUSING UP MAKING MORE UNAFFORDABLE FOR THE AVERAGE PERSON.

AND THERE IS AN EXODUS OF PEOPLE LEAVING THE STATE FOR A VARIETY OF REASONS.